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Quiet Hollers share apocalyptic love song “Mont Blanc” — listen

on September 18, 2015, 2:35pm

Louisville, Kentucky’s Quiet Hollers may sound indebted to alternative country, but the group is imbued with a punk rock soul. Much of that can be attributed to frontman Shadwick Wilde, who was formerly a guitar-for-hire for bands like Dischord Records’ Iron Cross before venturing down his own road as a singer-songwriter. Wilde carried the vibes of his working musician days over to the Americana sounds permeating Quiet Hollers’ 2013 debut, I Am The Morning. For their self-titled sophomore album, due out on October 23rd, the group continues to mine Wilde’s roots, presenting a new collection of songs that once more breaks the confines of roots music. Ahead of the release, the band has offered up a new song called “Mont Blanc”.

“‘Mont Blanc’ is a love song from the end of the world,” Wilde tells Consequence of Sound. “It draws inspiration from post-apocalyptic works like The Road (Cormac McCarthy), but in truth, I wrote the song after my wife and I moved to my family’s dilapidated farm outside Louisville. I imagined what life might be like for us here, if the rest of the world were to crumble into anarchic capitalist collapse, like many us of (especially those who pay attention to world news) think it could. Now that we have a child, the survival imperative is more real to me than it was then.”

Really, what’s more punk than the end of the world? Though the track is more of a wallowing, country epic than any kind of trasher, “Mont Blanc” carries with it a heavy sense of doom and fatalism that harken back to Wilde’s darker musical days. His drawl feels defeated, outlining his new life and lamenting the one he used to have, perhaps best encapsulated in the final coda: “Shed a tear for the books I should’ve read.” For all its weight, it’s a beautiful portrait that finds its strength in perspective, as well as some heart-tugging violin passages.

Listen in below.

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