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Ranking: Every Drake Song from Worst to Best

on March 27, 2017, 2:15pm
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This feature originally ran in May 2016. We’re updating following the drop of Drake’s new playlist, More Life.

Did you know that until last year’s “Pop Style”, Drake had never had a Number One single? It seems inconceivable, but it’s entirely true. In fact, that made our job ranking his songs that much harder — rather than a handful of hits that severely outpace the rest of the pack, Drake just has a ton of great songs, all jockeying for that number one spot.

But in picking apart that diverse catalog, some of the memes that get tossed at Drizzy start to come into sharper focus. Some of them are fair (dude writes a lot of songs about needing loyalty from his team, the women from his past, and the harsh reality of hooking up while famous), and some aren’t (that whole “He’s a phony, he was never on the bottom!” thing needs to just quiet down).

But more than anything, the fact that Drake is so meme-able came into focus. He’s aware of it, plays to it, yet still dictates his own narrative, evolving and producing the music he wants to make rather than chasing trends. For that reason, every corner of Aubrey Graham’s catalog deserves some attention, even some of the shadowy corners that he might not necessarily be excited about you looking into.

For clarity’s sake: All Drake songs were considered fair game for this ranking except remixes he jumped on, songs on which he featured, and some tracks from his albums on which he does not explicitly appear (the “Summers Over Interlude” from Views, for example). Rather than starting from the bottom, please start here.

–Adam Kivel

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200. “U.P.A. (Outro)”

Room for Improvement (2006)

After the fade-out for “Kick Push”, Aubrey Drake Gra-ham steps up at the Urban Piano Association to play the “Jamie Foxx Song Theme”. Well, we had to start somewhere, and this truly is the bottom. The mixtape title says it all. Let’s move on. –Adam Kivel
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199. “Teach U A Lesson”

Comeback Season (2007)

Long before Drake found his stride as a purported romanticist, he penned this cringeworthy series of bad sexual metaphors over Robin Thicke’s song of the same name. –Sheldon Pearce
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198. “Thrill Is Gone”

Room For Improvement (2006)

You can hear the mechanics of making a good Drake song coming together on a track like “Thrill Is Gone”, which finds the rapper exploring his romantic entanglements. But the ideas are wildly disjointed, and at one point he compares a rebound to sopping up gravy with a biscuit. –Sheldon Pearce
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197. “Come Winter”

Room For Improvement (2006)

Oh, Drake. It seems like forever ago since the release of Room for Improvement, which proved you’d be rap’s newest softie. “Come Winter” comes with a soulful beat courtesy of Amir and tells a story that can be annotated in two words: cuffing season. –Alejandra Ramirez
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196. “The Presentation”

Comeback Season (2007)

The opener to Drake’s mixtape Comeback Season, “The Presentation” starts with Drake spitting elementary school-level rhymes over a beat that’s so far into easy listening it could possibly be an elevator muzak sample. Even when the beat flips into something a little harder, it’s still so inoffensive and not even in a positive way. It’s just nothing, like amateur-hour quality. –Pat Levy
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195. “Underdog”

Comeback Season (2007)

This song has a Trey Songz rap verse … and the Drake verse is still worse. –Sheldon Pearce
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194. “Money (Remix)”

Room For Improvement (2006)

You know a Drake verse isn’t top-tier when it relies on a reference to the antagonist of the sequel to Ocean’s Eleven. But then it also finds Aubrey being told he should get as big as Pharrell, so you know how long ago this was released. –Adam Kivel
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193. “Share”

Comeback Season (2007)

Assisted by French producer Häzel, “Share” undoubtedly garnered a late ‘90s vibe close to the likes of 9th Wonder — who actually produced “Think Good Thoughts” — and the posthumous J Dilla. While most of Comeback Season was indebted to standard hip-hop spitfire delivery, “Share” showed Drake’s playful R&B cadences that would soon characterize his rapping fare 2009 onward. –Alejandra Ramirez
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192. “Bad Meaning Good”

Room For Improvement (2006)

Drake drops a Sesame Street reference in the middle of a verse in which he threatens violence in order to rob someone, and he also uses the word “coinkydink,” so we can just stop talking about this song now. This is soft Drake aspiring to be hard Drake and failing miserably. –Pat Levy
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191. “Karaoke”

Thank Me Later (2010)

On “Karaoke”, the spotlight becomes too bright for a longtime lover. But the melodies are hopelessly boring, so much so that it’s difficult to tell if he even misses this woman. –Sheldon Pearce
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190. “About the Game”

Room For Improvement (2006)

Just like in “Give Ya”, Trey Songz offers a few verses in Room for Improvement’s “About the Game”. A straight hustler’s anthem, the song features Drake with a pomp flare. “Chances are most of the days you was lying around,” he raps, “I made money, that’s why these girls eyeing me down/ By 19 I might seem destined for millions.” In only a matter of years, his prophecy would come true. –Alejandra Ramirez
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189. “Special”

Room For Improvement (2006)

This Pharrell production interpolates Stevie Wonder’s “My Cherie Amour” in a syrupy approximation, and Drake’s call-out to any girl that’s different on the open is equally vague but sweet. Voyce handles the hook, leaving Drake room to show off his burgeoning skills and self-awareness: “A new me, cool, see I never get around/ If I don’t change now I don’t think I’ll ever settle down.” Sounds about right. –Adam Kivel
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188. “KMT”

More Life

Maybe he wouldn’t sound so joyless bragging about the studio on his yacht if it wasn’t track 15 on a 22-track odyssey that more than most Drake albums would be rewarded by culling. Giggs sounds like he’s struggling to fill Drake’s inexplicable need for more space as well: loves breasts, “that white girl,” going platinum. His best moment is interpolating the Batman theme. –Dan Weiss
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187. “I Get Lonely Too”

N/A (2010)

Over the blandest, descending synth tones, Drake uses his still-developing singing voice to deliver a feigned moment of vulnerability in a restrained croon. It’s a ploy, a mere seduction technique. –Sheldon Pearce
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186. “Try Harder”

Room For Improvement (2006)

Drake has always been about the hustle, and while “Try Harder” shows Drake’s admiration for the game, there lies a little bit of insecurity beneath the braggadocio. In his late teens and early twenties, his projects circa 2006-2009 show an insecure rapper yearning for respect, and “Try Harder” stems from this uncertainty. –Alejandra Ramirez
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185. “Missin’ You”

Comeback Season (2007)

After using Voyce on his first tape, Drake upgraded to Trey Songz on Comeback Season, and “Missin’ You (Remix)” shows some growth. A remix of Songz’ own track, Drake delivers a solid enough verse about how he can’t stop thinking about the woman he just wants to make a “missus.” Trey’s verse is anodyne, but this isn’t a ranking of every Trey Songz song — we’re here for Drake, and there frankly isn’t a lot of him on this track. –Adam Kivel
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184. “All This Love”

Room For Improvement (2006)

This one’s essentially a ’90s R&B groover from Voyce (or “your boy V-O,” depending on who you ask), with a single Drake verse and some ad libs dropped into the mix. Over an instrumental snap of Tony Yayo’s “Pimpin'”, Drake talks about how the other rappers aren’t his friends: “So, they don’t like me/ They throw parties, and yet they never invite me.” –Adam Kivel
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183. “Outro”

So Far Gone (2009)

This song features Drake asking, “Are we done?”, then celebrates with the pop of a champagne bottle. In retrospect, it’s typical Drake, but given what So Far Gone would do for his career, is there really any other better way to celebrate? –Alejandra Ramirez
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182. “Bitch Is Crazy”

Comeback Season (2007)

Drake takes aim at an allegedly crazy girlfriend in this vindictive series of micro-aggressions, a transcript of transgressions. “I’d like to know if there’s a chemical imbalance in your makeup,” he sings sweetly, citing texting his ex and emailing his mom as some of her worst infractions. –Sheldon Pearce
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181. “Kick Push (Remix)”

Room For Improvement (2006)

Tacking a verse onto a more popular rapper’s song is something that a lot of struggle rappers will do to punch up their YouTube and Soundcloud numbers, and at this point in Drake’s career, that was something he needed to do. It’s hard to imagine that Drake has ever been on a skateboard, so his entire participation rings untrue. –Pat Levy
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180. “Replacement Girl”

Comeback Season (2007)

“This album’s for my fans/ But, yo, this hook is for my exes,” Drake drops, an astute assessment of his style very early in his career. The lovelorn rapper thing was on Drake’s plate from the start, as was the ambitious rapper looking to grow an empire. His verses about staying in hotels and traveling the world aren’t quite as specific or evocative as his later brags, but it’s a start.” –Adam Kivel
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179. “No Long Talk”

More Life

In a bizarre Kanye flow that inexplicably includes the word “ting,” this two-and-a-half minute exercise plays like a dry run for Drake’s sudden new accent; ill-gotten or not, it’s perfectly paired with Giggs’ Tricky-like growl. –Dan Weiss
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178. “Sooner Than Later”

So Far Gone (2009)

The synths on “Sooner Than Later” are something out of a generic Fruity Loops starter pack. –Sheldon Pearce
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177. “A Scorpio’s Mind”

Room For Improvement (2006)

“I’m bringing back hip-hop,” sings Nickelus F on “A Scorpio’s Mind”, which somehow sounds convincing before Drake and the Richmond rapper delve into a traditionalist freestyle beneath a soulful beat. This isn’t the Drake we’re used to now, but he’s just as charming and welcoming. –Alejandra Ramirez
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176. “Nothings Into Somethings”

More Life

Drake’s worst quality that he’s overrated for is taking everything as a personal affront to him. His ex gets engaged “on him,” doesn’t have the stomach to tell him (or you know, forgot he existed, an option Drake’s sure never thought of), and most gallingly, doesn’t even send him an invite to the wedding. Dude. Get. The. Hint. His retelling of these non-events is no more musical or charmful than it reads, in case you were concerned about the artistry getting shorted. –Dan Weiss
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175. “S.T.R.E.S.S.”

Room For Improvement (2006)

While good stretches of Drake’s first tape sounded kind of hesitant when it came to dropping verses, “S.T.R.E.S.S.” runs in headfirst. They’re not all great (“There’s questions that need to be answered that’s not on the test/ Instead of starin’ at quizzes now it’s models with breasts”), but it shows the fearlessness and intensity that would come later. –Adam Kivel
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174. “AM 2 PM”

Room For Improvement (2006)

Nickelus F and Drake trade near-breathless flows at a drilling pace, seemingly trying to simulate the sun-up to sun-down grind they rap about in their verses. –Sheldon Pearce
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173. “The Last Hope”

Comeback Season (2007)

Drake and fellow Torontonian Kardinal Offishial take on a chill beat and a late ’90s R&B hook from Andreena Mills. Each takes a verse, neither is very memorable, but the track is pleasant enough. Considering the whole Southern Smoke push on Room for Improvement, it’s good to hear the Canadian we’ve all come to know and love. –Adam Kivel
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172. “Video Girl”

Room For Improvement (2006)

This one features “Slick Rick mode,” used to unravel a story about falling in love with a video vixen. Rather than the song you’d expect, though, he sings about wanting her to feel empowered and promising not to treat her like Thandie Newton in Crash, because this is Drake. –Adam Kivel
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171. “Find Your Love”

Thank Me Later (2010)

“Find Your Love” was the big Drake and Kanye single that never quite hit the mark. Its thumping rhythms overpower the simple melody, driven mostly by a Jeff Bhasker keyboard riff. –Sheldon Pearce
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170. “Give Ya”

Comeback Season (2007)

Similar to “Replacement Girl”, “Give Ya” finds Trey Songz offering his bedroom-eyed hooks. The song even finds Songz offering a verse. The two rap about impressing girls given their new notoriety and fame: “You can stop frontin’, I know you heard of me, baby girl, ya, ya, ya heard of me.” And despite the brag, it’s almost cute given their naiveté and age back in 2007. –Alejandra Ramirez
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169. “Let’s Call It Off”

So Far Gone (2009)

Someone should have advised Drake and Swedish three-piece Peter, Bjorn and John to take the song’s title to heart and call off this collaboration. This is a case of the trendy late 2000s move of combining two hot musical acts in hopes of catching crossover appeal, and it just doesn’t. –Pat Levy
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168. “Make Things Right”

Room For Improvement (2006)

The Boi-1da and Amir beat is a soul sample gem, and (surprise surprise) Drake uses it to tell all the ladies out there that they’re worth more than going wild at the club and the dudes not to take advantage of them. It doesn’t yet have a unique stamp, but that production! –Adam Kivel
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167. “Man of the Year”

Comeback Season (2007)

Long before actually being voted anyone’s Man of the Year, Drake penned this ode to his own greatness, anchored by Lil Wayne, then the actual Man of the Year (2007). –Sheldon Pearce
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166. “Houstatlantavegas”

So Far Gone (2009)

This song kicks off with “Hey there, pretty girl,” which is quite possibly the most predatory that Drake has ever come across. It’s sappy-crooning Drake, basically farting out some anthem for the thots who share hotel rooms at all-star weekends and are the type of girls who could dupe Drake into tattooing their names on his heart. This song is about as vacuous as Drake gets. –Pat Levy
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165. “Practice”

Take Care (2011)

The best thing about this song is the sample of Juvenile’s “Back That Azz Up”, which Drake subsequently makes less cool by ending every line of the hook with “won’t you back that ass up.” Is this one of the early examples of Drake taking someone else’s good work, bending it to his own will, and then running it into the ground? Possibly. –Pat Levy
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164. “Cece’s Interlude”

Thank Me Later (2010)

R&B Drake is back again to pine for one specific women who won’t be with him because he’s too famous. In one of the few relatable Drake moments, he yearns to be back in college so he can be with the girl he had in his dorm room. I think most people can look back on their college relationships with a certain safe level of disconnect, while still longing for the simplicity of what you had. Drake exclusively longs. Classic Drake. –Pat Levy
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163. “Think Good Thoughts”

Comeback Season (2007)

Drake, Phonte, and Elzhi aim to prove wrong the idea that rappers don’t have much substance. To which end, Drake drops a verse about … hooking up with women? At least Phonte talks about his vocabulary and degree. But Drizzy insists in the hook that he’s a good guy, so we’ll take his word for it. –Adam Kivel
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162. “The Resistance”

Thank Me Later (2010)

A quintessential Drake song, “The Resistance” is one of the handful of his records you can listen to and immediately understand what the Toronto rapper is all about. There’s an Almost Famous reference, bars about his suburban upbringing and his sudden rise to fame (“I avoided the coke game and went with Sprite instead”), and passive-aggression in spades. –Sheldon Pearce
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161. “Do What You Do”

Room For Improvement (2006)

“Do What U Do” finds Drake going in over a Boi-1da beat that has a legitimate mixtape feel that Drake all but abandoned after Comeback Season. Braggadocios abound, and Drake raps about million-dollar deals and driving around in Phantoms and Cadillacs (which he pronounces “Catillac”) before dropping one of the hokiest bridges in recent rap history. “Two years ago, a friend of mine/ Asked me to kick some new school lines” may as well be “My name is Drake and I’m here to say/ I’ve come to rap in a Canadian way.” –Pat Levy
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160. “Hate Sleeping Alone”

Take Care (2011)

The signature Drake flow is on display on “Hate Sleeping Alone”, but there’s such a lack of substance to this song. The entirety of the track is essentially “I’d rather be sleeping with you, but if you aren’t around, then I have to sleep with someone else, even though I like you a lot.” So basically Drake just can’t do relationships? He’d rather be unfaithful than be alone in a bed? Dude, if you’re alone in the bed you can stretch out and sleep in whatever position you want. How is that not a plus for you? Also, I 100% guarantee that Drake sleeps curled up in a little ball and prefers to be the little spoon. 100%. –Pat Levy
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159. “Asthma Team”

Room For Improvement (2006)

This is one of Drake’s better start-to-finish flows, going nonstop throughout the track with very decent rhymes. As far as Comeback Season goes, this is one of the highlights. But in the context of Drake’s entire discography, it’s just a track that shows off a bygone era in Drake’s career where he would bust out a two-minute flow in the middle of a mixtape. –Pat Levy
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158. “Jorja Interlude”

More Life

Pretty, pitched-up dreaminess is no stranger to hip-hop backing, though harmonica’s somewhat new to it. Drake’s choppy Future flow is a gimmick fading fast even for Future though. –Dan Weiss
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157. “Lust For Life”

So Far Gone (2009)

Over an eerie, shadowy Tears for Fears sample courtesy of 40, Drake drops one long, cloudy verse and a few puffs of sung rejoinder. There’s a quiet intensity to this one, the lust for life channeled through its cold certainty of the inevitability of its end. –Adam Kivel
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156. “Since Way Back”

More Life

The problem with PARTYNEXTDOOR is that he never sounds bad when he shows up, he has yet to drop in on anything that needed him in the first place. This six-minute sparsefest is as pretty and friendly and sincere as anything else on the unprecedented near-joy of More Life. But it wouldn’t have been missed either. Best heard under the notion that it’s the proper album closer with “Fake Love” beginning the encore/bonus cuts. –Dan Weiss
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155. “Barry Bonds Freestyle”

Comeback Season (2007)

Riffing off the sample of Kanye West’s “Barry Bonds”, Drake spitfires in a typical braggadocio lyricism that strays away from his charismatic melody in favor of straightforward freestyle. Behind the hard boom-bap fixtures, Drake’s delivery burns with clunkers and pop culture references like Michael Jordan and Chips Ahoy on tow. –Alejandra Ramirez
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154. “Shut It Down”

Thank Me Later (2010)

A sheepishly sung two-part attempt to persuade a faceless woman into having sex. Its saving grace is the complementary falsetto and harmonies added by The-Dream. –Sheldon Pearce
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153. “Faded”

Comeback Season (2007)

A highlight of Drake’s second tape, this one would likely reach higher if it weren’t so damn short. It’s under a minute and a half, but fun; Rich Kidd’s skittering beat and twinkling synths give Drake space to drift and flow with stuttering punchlines. –Adam Kivel
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152. “Don’t You Have a Man”

Comeback Season (2006)

“And so she want this chap’s stick like Napoleon Dynamite.” With that line, Drake boils down this entire track, a goofy joke that only Drake could land with the sort of sincerity he does here. Other than that, it’s mostly a track about a woman who is coming after Drake despite having a guy back home, which he wants nothing to do with. It’s an old trope, but delivered here faithfully. –Adam Kivel
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151. “Do What U Do (Remix)”

Comeback Season (2007)

Bringing back that mixtape boom-bap, Drake teamed up with Malice from Clipse and Nickelus F for a remix of “Do What U Do” from his first mixtape. The inclusion of Malice is what ranks this track higher than the original, because Malice actually fits over this beat. Drake ups the ante from the original but still falls short next to the Clipse rapper, because when you’re on a track with a rapper who is really about that life, it’s easy to seem inauthentic like Drake does. –Pat Levy
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150. “Sacrifices”

More Life

There’s nothing particularly wrong with the light-touch “Sacrifices” — except for its egregious five-minute running time on an 81-minute, cough, playlist. “It’s a marathon not a sprint but I still gotta win the race,” Drake insists, though he’d win more consistently if he conceived them as sprints for sure. –Dan Weiss

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149. “Where To Now”

Comeback Season (2007)

This two-minute jam takes a J Dilla beat, a move that many other rappers couldn’t pull off at all on their second tape. Plus, it’s the track in which Drake asks a girl who’s into reading “all them pro-black, pro-female books” to come over and watch a season of Flight of the Conchords, which if there’s an ur-Drake moment, comes close. –Adam Kivel
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148. “Congratulations”

N/A (2009)

“Congratulations” takes a sample of Coldplay’s “Viva La Vida” and scales it down, making it feel way smaller and less anthemic, providing the necessary space for Drake to rap cliches. –Sheldon Pearce
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147. “The Calm”

So Far Gone (2009)

By So Far Gone, Drake had already perfected the art of the humble-brag: part self-deprecating, part bragging introspection in which Drake raps about how fame unfortunately interferes with his personal life. In “The Calm”, he pontificates on these problems: “Look what I became, tryna make a name/ All my first dates are interrupted by my fame.” Drake is truly famous, and perhaps, in his eyes, it’ll only get worse … sort of. –Alejandra Ramirez
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146. “Thank Me Now”

Thank Me Later (2010)

In the first verse of this Timbaland-produced track, Drake raps, “I’m on the brink of influential,” and he was right. What he left out was that he was also on the brink of being good, because this is one of those “close but no cigar” situations. The beat doesn’t quite bang like Timbaland’s usual fare, but it’s passable. And even with a beat that’s only decent, Drake isn’t able to elevate the track like he can with less than stellar beats now. Thank Me Later was a strong step in the direction, something that “Thank Me Now” recognizes. –Pat Levy
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145. “Girls Love Beyonce”

N/A (2013)

Drake is in the feelings and lonely again. It’s funny to think that Drake heard “Say My Name” and somehow got emotional and decided to borrow the hook and let the earnest James Fauntleroy sing it. Given years of experience, Drake is wiser, but that doesn’t make him any less lovelorn or confused. –Alejandra Ramirez
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144. “Extra Special”

Room For Improvement (2006)

Early career Drake was the type of guy who earnestly felt he could take a Stevie Wonder sample and do something showstopping. Early career Drake was mistaken. This song is a slap in the face of Stevie, flipping “My Cherie Amour” into a sped-up backdrop for vacuous raps about relationships and khakis. It’s more snooze than star. –Pat Levy
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143. “The Ride”

Take Care (2011)

The hostile closer to Take Care turns the Weeknd’s silky smooth vocals into a winding loop upon which the OVO boss laments not being able to have real connections. It’s all about feeling alienated, about how fame distances people. –Sheldon Pearce
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142. “A Night Off”

So Far Gone (2009)

Sappy slow jam Drake back with a vengeance, and unlike Die Hard with a Vengeance, this one lacks an explosive quality. “A Night Off” is Drake’s favorite song on So Far Gone, which really makes me question Drake’s taste in his own music. How high would he have this one ranked if he was making this list? –Pat Levy
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141. “My Side”

If You’re Reading This, It’s Too Late (2015)

A bonus track to the surprise physical release of an unexpected mixtape, “My Side” could’ve been about as superfluous as a rap track could possibly be. But instead, this Boi-1da-produced slow-burner finds Drake indulging his singing style on the hook (in which the end of each line falls a few notes off a monotone, rather than crooning the whole way) and pushing the verse with a punch. –Adam Kivel
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140. “Must Hate Money”

Comeback Season (2007)

Aside from Rich Boy referencing the classic film John Tucker Must Die, “Must Hate Money” lacks a standout moment. Drake shouldn’t be getting shown up on his own tracks, especially not by Rich Boy. –Pat Levy
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139. “Bria’s Interlude”

So Far Gone (2009)

Paying Missy Elliot tribute by snatching the beat from her “Friendly Skies”, Drake doesn’t rap, choosing to opt for buttery R&B timbres right beside Omarion. At moments like these, it’s easy to see how Drake was a post-808s and Heartbreaks artist, lazily singing over lush and minimal samples. –Alejandra Ramirez
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138. “Gyalchester”

More Life

As Future’s albums have become increasingly cold and monotonous, it’s bizarre to hear his signature flow and undercooked ambience employed between more variegated, even songful tracks, and sounds better deep in a valley than in a nuance-free threading of constant peaks. “I don’t take naps” was more powerful when Kevin Gates said it, but Drake’s assertion that he’s no longer merely a Top Five rapper but Top Two sounds shockingly sure of itself. –Dan Weiss
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137. “Free Spirit”

N/A (2011)

Over a sample of Sade’s “I Will Be Your Friend”, Drake teams up with Rick Ross to try and convince women to tattoo the rappers’ names on themselves. –Sheldon Pearce
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136. “Comeback Season”

Comeback Season (2007)

The title track to Comeback Season is one of the most orthodox hip-hop songs on the mixtape. Produced my Nottz, “Comeback Season” features a hard-hitting beat fit alongside Drake’s self-assured mantra. But this doesn’t come along without some clunkers on the way: “Cause Drake’s syllables is like Jake Gyllenhaal/ Can’t help it I been brainwashed to kill em’ all.” Ugh … what?. –Alejandra Ramirez
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135. “Best I Ever Had”

So Far Gone (2009)

Talk shit about this song all you want, but “Best I Ever Had” is one of Drake’s best hooks. This song was all over the radio stations circa 2009 and served as the karaoke song for every tween girl: “You da best I ever had, best I ever had.” It could be argued that Drake didn’t get around to actually topping this hook until “Hotline Bling”. –Alejandra Ramirez
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134. “Now & Forever”

If You’re Reading This, It’s Too Late (2015)

Aside from “Star67”, “Now & Forever” is the If You’re Reading This track that most directly references Drake’s issues with Cash Money records and Birdman. But unlike “Star67”, this song finds Drake being more passive about things, not going directly for the jugular but instead framing the situation almost like a breakup. “Star67” is bright-future Drake; “Now & Forever” is sad boy. –Pat Levy

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133. “Uptown”

So Far Gone (2009)

Produced by Boi-1da and Northern Profit, “Uptown” features one of the best beats off So Far Gone. The track features stellar verses from Lil Wayne and Bun B, while Drake delivers another one of his best hooks off the album. –Alejandra Ramirez
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132. “So Far Gone”

So Far Gone (2009)

This Lykke Li-aided track straddles some strange line between indie pop and quasi-R&B, with a beat that floats along without committing to one direction. This song sticks out in the greater landscape of Drake’s catalog; it doesn’t really fit with any other song he’s done. A departure from the norm can be exciting, and this is totally unusual. –Pat Levy
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131. “Easy To Please”

Comeback Season (2007)

This is typical Drake going off on the beat. But considering its brevity, Rich Kidd’s eclectic and erratic production, and the hook duet, there seems something so off-the-cuff about the song that works. –Alejandra Ramirez
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130. “City Is Mine”

Room For Improvement (2006)

A series of beeps, which blink in alternate sequences, lay the groundwork for “City Is Mine”, one of the better Drake songs of the pre-So Far Gone era. He’s still ironing out the kinks in his flow and trying to cut down on the cringeworthy bars, but it’s easy to hear the promise. –Sheldon Pearce
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129. “Light Up”

Thank Me Later (2010)

On his debut studio album, Drake receives some sage advice from the Hov: “Drake, here’s how they gonna come at you/ With silly rap feuds, trying to distract you.” Little did Jay Z know, though, that when they did come at him, Drake would have the dis tracks to bury all comers. In the meantime, “Light Up” finds Drake matching the bar the legend sets, an impressive feat for a debut. –Adam Kivel
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128. “Fear”

So Far Gone (EP) (2009)

On “Fear”, Drake ponders rap immortality, longing to be remembered and remembering other rap greats: “I never cried when Pac died, but I probably will when Hov does/ And if these tears hold value, then I will drop one for every single thing he showed us.” (The line about using a writer to balance out his flows feels incredibly prescient, given all that’s happened.) –Sheldon Pearce
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127. “The Real Her”

Take Care (2011)

Accompanied by moody keys and lush electronics courtesy of Noah “40” Shebib, Drake now drifts between lazy bedroom-eyed choruses and introspective rhymes of his myriad female acquaintances and favorite vice cities. But if we’re being honest, Andre 3000 stole the show. –Alejandra Ramirez
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126. “Successful”

So Far Gone (2009)

A track good enough to be used twice, “Successful” features on So Far Gone and Trey Songz’ Ready. Drake, Trey, and Wayne want to be successful, whatever that means, at all costs. It’s not the most iconic track (maybe even a little flat), but Drake still manages to get a few barbs in. –Adam Kivel
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125. “Fire and Desire”

Views (2016)

drake views 6 album stream mp3 listen Ranking: Every Drake Song from Worst to Best

The sped-up Brandy sample isn’t the only thing straight out of the ‘90s on this one. Patches of Views stick into an R&B sway, and “Fire and Desire” is the most shrug-worthy of the bunch. That said, even the most disposable track on Drake’s newest has enough soul and sincerity to have devotees ready it for bedroom playlists — just don’t count on paying too much attention. –Adam Kivel
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124. “Trophies”

N/A (2013)

“Trophies” was cut from Nothing Was the Same because it wasn’t finished in time for the album’s release, condemning it to loosie status. As it stands, “Trophies” is a fun turn-up song but has nothing of substance. It’s an ode to winning — being successful is cool, but Drake puts the emphasis on doing something engaging with that platform. –Pat Levy
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123. “Fireworks”

Thank Me Later (2010)

The opener to Drake’s proper debut kicks things off with a bang — literally. After some fireworks and an Alicia Keys hook, Drizzy offers a few verses about his explosion into the upper tier of the rap game. He gets personal about relationship issues, his parents’ divorce, and his table-setting etiquette, announcing his arrival. –Adam Kivel
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122. “Doing It Wrong”

Take Care (2011)

“Doing It Wrong” could have been incredibly corny. In it, Drake mutters cheesy, feel-better lines from a psychologist: “When a good thing goes bad, it’s not the end of the world/ It’s just the end of a world that you had with one girl.” As his musings are sustained over brooding synths and Stevie Wonder’s harmonica solo, the song somehow seems moving. –Alejandra Ramirez
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121. “Can’t Have Everything”

More Life

Emblematic of More Life’s filler tracks that don’t make us mad, and even perversely charming to hear Drake’s problem put so simply that he wants it all but he can’t have it. Someone introduce him to Faith No More, stat. –Dan Weiss
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120. “305 To My City”

Nothing Was the Same (2013)

Drake has a long, pronounced relationship with strippers and stripper culture. “305 To My City” is among his most interesting portrayals of pole-dancing, spending time inside both the club and the locker room. It’s one of the few times he considers the dancers’ perspectives. –Sheldon Pearce
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119. “I’m Going In”

So Far Gone (EP) (2009)

Drake and Wayne make for a good team, and “I’m Going In” highlights their interplay. After a deliriously Auto-Tuned Weezy introduces himself, Drake jumps in to call himself “big dick bandit” and dictate the state of his cred. Needlz’s production lives up to his name, pinprick synths needling along the sub-bass and whomping percussion. –Adam Kivel
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118. “Right Hand”

N/A (2015)

This track looks to the core of relationships, trust, and friendship, and what kind of person should sit at the 6 God’s right-hand side. But, more than anything, it features Frank Dukes and Vinylz’ delightfully retro synths and Drake’s sing-song lyrical flow. –Adam Kivel
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117. “November 18th”

So Far Gone (2009)

Drake tips his cap to the screw culture of his second (third?) home, Houston, in this slo-mo reenactment of a night lost in a codeine haze. –Sheldon Pearce
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116. “Closer”

Comeback Season (2007)

In lieu of basing his style around his singing ability and pop leanings, Drake, in Comeback Season, leaned heavily towards a focus on rhyme lyricism. “Closer” is a perfect example, as his flow is seamless and impressive while he talks of his struggle to attain success due to his non-violent subject matter. Accompanied by the soulful Andreena Mill, he couldn’t do wrong. –Alejandra Ramirez
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115. “You & The 6”

If You’re Reading This, It’s Too Late (2015)

Apparently, Drake’s mom’s got Google Alerts set up to get the news on her son, which, frankly, sounds like a nightmare. Can you imagine getting all those messages? On “You & the 6”, Drake discusses his relationship with his mom, her attempts at setting him up with her personal trainer, and his attempts at explaining his complicated love life and career aspirations to her. He’s equal parts fiery intensity and sighing love, the kind of thing you’d expect from one of the world’s greatest getting caught up equally in the game and his love for his mother. Drake’s an honest artist, and this track exemplifies that. –Adam Kivel
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114. “Redemption”

Views (2016)

drake views 6 album stream mp3 listen Ranking: Every Drake Song from Worst to Best

Yet another in a long line of “Drake’s woman thinks he’s fooling around but he’s not” songs, “Redemption” actually goes so far as to list some of the women who he’s been with and where they are now. It’s the Ray J-sampling slow jam that talks about the woman who sued him over use of her voice in a previous slow jam — not the most memorable of its type, nor the least. –Adam Kivel
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113. “No Frauds”

N/A (2017)

“Why do niggas that are not involved love to get involved” is a curious line from a dude guesting on someone else’s diss track — or a brilliant one, but Drake otherwise does little to distract from Nicki’s bum-bitch bolero, which among other things manages to turn a cred-hopeful underdog’s jail bid into the rap sheet it is. –Dan Weiss

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112. “Club Paradise”

N/A (2011)

When “Club Paradise” was released, it was obvious Drake was still facing remorse over leaving home due to his newfound fame, the feeling that ran throughout Thank Me Later and So Far Gone. While the track was meant to be on Take Care, the song was taken out as that record took a left turn as he came to accept his fame and all the trials that come with it. He struggles to realize he’s no longer the homecoming hero: “She like, ‘Why you even give a fuck, you not even here?’” Melancholic Drake at his finest. –Alejandra Ramirez
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111. “The Motion”

Nothing Was the Same (2013)

“It’s not me and you/ It’s not me, it’s you,” Drake croons in the opening seconds of “The Motion”, setting the tone for a Sampha-assisted breakdown of deteriorating relationships. –Sheldon Pearce
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110. “Unforgettable”

Thank Me Later (2010)

If this song didn’t have a Jeezy feature, it’d surely be lower on this list, as Drake absolutely nails it in his first line when he says, “This is really one of my dumbest flows ever.” You’re right, Drake! It’s not that good! But at least we get the long-awaited confirmation that Drake isn’t Santa Claus when he raps about having something for the bad bitches. This song is the opposite of its title. —Pat Levy
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109. “Shot For Me”

Take Care (2011)

Another ode to his exes, “Shot for Me” has Drake switching between the machismo you’ll-never-have-anyone-like-me mantra to a sensitive, hopeless romantic. Drake is great at making corny things sound earnest and serious, as he jokingly tells his exes to take a shot for him and the love that could have been. Well, what more could you expect if you also have The Weeknd as a cowriter?. –Alejandra Ramirez
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108. “Used To”

If You’re Reading This, It’s Too Late (2015)

Drake and Lil Wayne have been all over each other’s catalogs for years with varied results, and “Used To” is perfectly middling in every way. Neither rapper drops an unforgettable verse, the beat isn’t anything to write home about. But it’s still got two of the generation’s more exciting voices, so there’s that. –Pat Levy
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107. “U With Me?”

Views (2016)

drake views 6 album stream mp3 listen Ranking: Every Drake Song from Worst to Best

This one starts with a sample of DMX, a pretty un-Drake rapper: manic, vicious, aggressive as hell. (Not that Drake is soft, it’s just that you don’t remember the Ruff Ryder for his ballads.) But then Drizzy hooks everything into his expensive umbrella: “On some DMX shit/ I group-DM my exes.” The 40 beat is just so familiar too. –Adam Kivel
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106. “Up All Night”

Thank Me Later (2010)

Boi-1da’s burning strings and steely percussion provide an intense backing for Drake and Nicki as they trade verses about their absolute supremacy. This is also the track in which Drake says “toodles to you bitches,” which is something worth knowing. –Adam Kivel
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105. “Do Not Disturb”

More Life

Drake-in-a-nutshell status reports have been closing his overlong albums for years. But has any ever been so streamlined as to have the man briefly pause to wonder what he’ll do when he stops being popular, and then wondering immediately after if he’ll ever stop being popular. This time he’s so close to being down-to-earth that you don’t actually wish he’ll find out. –Dan Weiss

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104. “6 God”

If You’re Reading This, It’s Too Late (2015)

On If You’re Reading This It’s Too Late, the unease with fame of his earlier years has turned him into a lonely, reclusive despot. Success, perhaps, creates more problems than it solves, which is why he sticks to himself and his own crew: “Nobody really likes us except for us/ All I ever need was the squad.” –Alejandra Ramirez
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103. “Look What You’ve Done”

Take Care (2011)

Deep down, Drake is a family man. A touching tribute to his mother, grandmother, and uncle, “Look What You’ve Done” has Drake getting personal on his pre-fame family life and daddy issues. With his straightforward flow and off-the-cuff imagery, the song is sweet and touching, one of the best off of Take Care. –Alejandra Ramirez
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102. “Say What’s Real”

So Far Gone (2009)

Drake took to Kanye’s “Say You Will” to vent on “Say What’s Real”, a nearly four-minute marathon of hookless rapping. He talks adjusting to fame (“my mother’s embarrassed to pull my Phantom out/ So I park about five houses down/ She said I shouldn’t have it until I have the crown, but I don’t want to feel the need to wear disguises around”) and takes shots at label execs, surveying his old life as he enters another. It’s a pivotal moment in his own kingmaking. –Sheldon Pearce
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101. “Money (Remix)”

N/A (2014)

Did Drake singlehandedly ruin Johnny Manziel’s career by referencing him in a song before he was even drafted? Hard to say, but: yes. Drake also drops one of his most mundane culinary brags, rapping, “Last night I tried some raw oysters.” That’s … not that cool. Might as well say, “Last night I tried some chicken tenders.” –Pat Levy
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100. “I’m the Plug”

What a Time to Be Alive (2015)

When Drake and Future finally announced their team-up mixtape, there was some uncertainty as to how well the two would mesh — in addition to some of the most frenzied anticipation in the scene. But though they don’t always cover the same ground, “I’m the Plug” shows a fusion of their styles. Whether we’re talking drugs or the rap game itself, the two celebrate their growth from hustlers to the top of the game. —Adam Kivel
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99. “Live From the Gutter”

What a Time to Be Alive (2015)

Drake’s verse begins with a contradiction, wherein he reports live from the gutter, but then says he’ll buy the whole motherfucker. So which is it Drake? Are you so poor that you’re in the gutter, or are you so rich that you can buy any plot of land on which you currently reside? Aside from that quandary, “Live from the Gutter” is a good enough track. –Pat Levy
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98. “Sneakin’”

N/A (2016)

The rhyming is motoric and oddly dulled at the end of each line, possibly to match 21 Savage’s wry inflection. Both of them mention the Titanic for some reason, like that one Lonely Island song with the boiled goose, though Savage’s winning, for matching it with “outstanding.” As for Aubrey, his best line in show is “She texting purple hearts ‘cause she knows that we at war.” –Dan Weiss
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97. “We Made It (Freestyle)”

N/A (2013)

Given the opportunity to beat his chest, Drake hops on Soulja Boy’s “We Made It” to celebrate his success. The horns themselves are so triumphant that he doesn’t have to do much to set the mood (not to mention the Kenny Powers dialogue), but he’s still among the best at tooting his own horn, rapping braggadocious bars like “I’m out in the Caymans/ Rented a 12-bedroom house just to sleep all the women we came with/ That’s ignorant, ain’t it?” –Sheldon Pearce
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96. “9”

Views (2016)

drake views 6 album stream mp3 listen Ranking: Every Drake Song from Worst to Best

Even for those non-numerologists, “9” is a pretty significant number. For Drake, it represents how he went and turned Toronto, also known as The 6 (though if you’re this far into the list and haven’t caught on, shame on you), upside down. Another number weighs heavily on this one: Producer 40’s slow-burning is a real winner. –Adam Kivel
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95. “Change Locations”

What a Time To Be Alive (2015)

An ode to drinking places dry, “Change Locations” is one of the middling WATTBA tracks that is most notable for Future’s “60 naked bitches, no exaggeration” line and the fact that the beat is a Minecraft sample turned on its head. Only with Future in tow could Drake use a Minecraft sample on a song and not get absolutely torched for doing so, so props to him for picking his spots well. –Pat Levy
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94. “Days in the East”

N/A (2014)

Released in the middle of the night via his blog, “Days in the East” sounds like Drake fell into an evening’s random melancholic thoughts, and instead of writing in a journal or crying it out, he hit the studio. He even sounds tired and sad, as he recounts an experience many of us have had: It’s late at night while we’re lying in bed wishing that a certain someone would call us up. “Waitin’ on you to give in and hit me up/ So I could fall through like old times and hit it up.” It’s the same sad story, but Drake in his element. –Alejandra Ramirez
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93. “With You”

Views (2016)

drake views 6 album stream mp3 listen Ranking: Every Drake Song from Worst to Best

To be fair, this is a totally solid PARTYNEXTDOOR track. Murda Beatz’s click-plonk production is a syncopated delight, and the Auto-Tuned harmonies are nice, but there’s just not enough Drake on here to push it farther up the list. –Adam Kivel
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92. “30 For 30 Freestyle”

What A Time To Be Alive (2015)

With “30 for 30 Freestyle” being the only solo Drake track off the Future joint project What a Time To Be Alive, the song is definitely one of the most memorable amidst the album’s club bangers and melancholia beats. Some of 40’s best work, the song features his trademark piano flourishes among crisp percussion, as Drake aims to silence the critics in his classic self-assuring yet self-deprecating punchlines: “The pen is working if you niggas need some ghost lines/ I thought you wanted yours like I want mine.” –Alejandra Ramirez
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91. “Charged Up”

N/A (2015)

The less effective of two Meek Mill disses is still formidable in its own right, painting Meek as a snitch and taking aim at his sales, his label situation, and his tiered relationship. “I bought my niggas rollies off of Thank Me Later while these boys were Stanky Legging,” he raps. —Sheldon Pearce
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90. “Wu-Tang Forever”

Nothing Was the Same (2013)

It seems fitting that a Drake song called “Wu-Tang Forever” sounds nothing like any Wu-Tang song ever made, more homage to the legendary rap group than it is emulative. Within, he chronicles how life has changed since his Degrassi days, alluding to a club brawl with longtime rival Chris Brown: “I just like the rush when you see an enemy somewhere in the club and you realize/ They just not in a position to reciprocate your energy/ You ain’t never worried ‘cause he’s not who he pretends to be.” Its central theme: Heavy is the head that wears the crown. –Sheldon Pearce
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89. “Company”

If You’re Reading This, It’s Too Late (2015)

Drake likes hotels, and it’s great to hear him shout-out the specific luxury hotel he’s staying at in Houston. And then he does it again later, with a different hotel. All the while he’s admitting his canine tendencies in love (complete with dogs barking) and inviting a stripper to join him once she’s done with her shift. Travi$ Scott’s verse closes things on a whimper, but even that can’t completely sink an otherwise burning cut. –Adam Kivel
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88. “9AM in Dallas Freestyle”

N/A (2010)

The lowest ranking of the three “moment in time” tracks, “9AM in Dallas Freestyle” could’ve functioned as an intro to Thank Me Later, but was apparently finished just after the album was sent for mastering. Instead, it stands as a telling idea of where Drake was at just prior to his debut: ready, hungry, and willing to prove it. Over three and a half minutes of relentless bars, “9AM” makes good use of every second of Boi-1da’s epic, glowing morning beat. –Adam Kivel
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87. “The Motto”

Take Care (2011)

“The Motto”, which helped coin the phrase YOLO, is home to one of the more quotable Drake verses (“YMCMB, you niggas more YMCA”) and pays homage to the Bay Area hyphy scene (even shouting out the late, great hyphy innovator Mac Dre and featuring Mista F.A.B. in the video). Its signature bounce is so infectious it’s easy to forget how awful the Tyga verse is. –Sheldon Pearce
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86. “Fancy”

Thank Me Later (2010)

“Oh you fancy, huh?” Swizz Beats delivers that ultra-quotable hook, in addition to having produced the track, laying the groundwork for T.I. and Drake verses, with some bonus vocals from none other than Mary J. Blige. In fact, the track was initially meant to be a Blige song, but wound up in Drake’s hands, so he used her vocals as backing. That’s some ingenuity, and the end result is a fun radio single. –Adam Kivel
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85. “Own It”

Nothing Was the Same (2013)

Slow jam R&B Drake isn’t always going to be the most popular Drake, but with PARTYNEXTDOOR on the background vocals and Detail on production, “Own It” stacks up just fine next to his other soulful material. Feminist Drake peeks through the lyrics a bit as well, giving his heart to the song’s subject and putting the ball entirely in her court. The whole song is basically: “Yeah I like you, what are you gonna do about it?” –Pat Levy

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84. “Lord Knows”

Take Care (2011)

Drake knew that some people think he’s soft, that his constant emotional confessionals became memes and jokes a long time ago. On “Lord Knows”, he goes tough: “I know it so well, I know the hustle so well,” he insists and teams up with Rick Ross to prove it. But then, at the same time, he insists he’s “a descendent of either Marley or Hendrix,” so that eccentric artist side isn’t going away anytime soon either. Ross makes use of the Just Blaze track too, dropping his Cookie Monster whomp ad-lib to great effect. –Adam Kivel
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83. “Over”

Thank Me Later (2010)

The first single from Thank Me Later, “Over” finds Drake somewhere between the confident, composed rap superstar we know today and the total herb punchline rapper of his earlier mixtapes. Hackneyed Jada Pinkett and Ebert & Roeper lyrics aside, “Over” leans more towards the former than the latter, and that’s what keeps it this high on the list. –Pat Levy
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82. “Ignant Shit”

So Far Gone (2009)

Drake and Lil Wayne hop on Jay Z’s “Ignorant Shit” beat for “Ignant Shit”, and much like the song’s title downgrade, the end result is also a downgrade from the original. There are some hokey-ass lines on this song, like “rest in peace to Heath Ledger but I’m no joker” and “making enough to pay any Judge Judy off.” As per usual, Drake’s intentions seem good, keeping this track from the trash. –Pat Levy
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81. “Controlla”

Views (2016)

drake views 6 album stream mp3 listen Ranking: Every Drake Song from Worst to Best

Throughout Views, Drake gets on his island vibe, and the results vary. The pre-album take featured Popcaan, and the removal of the burgeoning Jamaican star on the official release mutes some of the flavor. It’s still a nice, mellow bounce. Plus, Aubrey gets into a real Lionel Richie “All Night Long” flow on one of the verses. (Seriously, try not to think “Fiesta, forever” when the second verse goes, “Yeah okay, you like it.”) It’s a pleasant, warm breeze. –Adam Kivel
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80. “Teenage Fever”

More Life

His “You Got Me” bite wasn’t better than the original. His “Back That Azz Up” was about par. And here Drake’s “If You Had My Love” steals J. Lo’s debut single out from under her. And he wonders why she never gave him her new number? –Dan Weiss
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79. “Over My Dead Body”

Take Care (2011)

There’s no other album that quite captures the zeitgeist of the Drake era like Take Care does. The album came to solidify him as the emotive R&B maestro post-808s and Heartbreaks. And, in retrospect, “Over My Dead Body” serves as a beautiful album opener given its introspective “you win some you lose some” attitude, 40’s gorgeous production, and Chantal Kreviazuk’s swirling vocal hook. It was merely perfect. –Alejandra Ramirez
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78. “Preach”

If You’re Reading This, It’s Too Late (2015)

It’s easy to say that there’s little room for obvious singles on If You’re Reading This, It’s Too Late. But given PARTYNEXTDOOR’s rapid-fire and humorous flow — “You old niggas boring as bones/ I get her hot like wasabi” — and minimal production, the song had good reasons to find its way on a chart somehow. –Alejandra Ramirez
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77. “Unstoppable”

So Far Gone (2009)

Drake took one of the standout records from Santigold’s Santogold, “Unstoppable”, and serviced it into a functional soundbed for rap boasts. He’s still figuring things out here, rap-wise (“I belong right where you see me/ Ain’t on the fence about it, I ain’t Mr. Feeney”), but the sparse production serves as a crutch for his work-in-progress flow. Lil Wayne turns in a show-stealing performance. –Sheldon Pearce
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76. “Miss Me”

Thank Me Later (2010)

“Miss Me” is one of the better early Drake and Lil Wayne tag-team records, or at least one of the few where Wayne doesn’t lyrically grind him into paste. There’s more balance to this song than most of their collaborations, which usually swing dramatically one way or the other, depending on the year. With about 64 bars between them, this one has punchlines for days. –Sheldon Pearce
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75. “Keep the Family Close

Views (2016)

drake views 6 album stream mp3 listen Ranking: Every Drake Song from Worst to Best

Drake opened Views loaded for bear … if his former friends and lovers were bears. Dude has a serious thing for calling out anyone who’s not entirely on his team, which I guess is the best way to be. The lush strings and grandiose production make the idea of “ride or die” seem entirely plausible, the drama of a relationship with Drake amped to epic scope. –Adam Kivel
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74. “Ice Melts”

More Life

An alternate ending for last year’s victorious Jeffery, a smitten, beast-mode Young Thug presents coherent advice: “You need to give love to someone / Before you end up like wah wah wah wah wah.” And it kinda sounds like No Doubt’s “Underneath It All”. This is pop now, folks. –Dan Weiss
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73. “Brand New”

So Far Gone (2009)

One of Drake’s greatest strengths as a songwriter is his conversational tone. He can capture the essence of a text thread or even the complexities of romantic tension, as he does on “Brand New”, a slow-moving R&B jam that spells out his doubts about a relationship growing stale. “This here is on some truthful shit/ It seems like everything I do you’re used to it/ And I hate hearing stories ’bout who you’ve been with,” he sings, feeling like he’s competing with the ghost of her ex. As he croons sweetly, he’s essentially taking the temperature of this romance. –Sheldon Pearce
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72. “Crew Love”

Take Care (2011)

Even five years after the release of Take Care, “Crew Love” still sounds more like a Weeknd song featuring Drake than the other way around. The Weeknd’s cocaine-laced raps and hooked croons, 40’s sluggish keyboard flourishes, and the woozy, sinuous vibes make this track best suited alongside The Weeknd’s eccentric brand of R&B and hip-hop. The Weeknd and Drake share blunts and stories as the former’s dejected and trashy rhymes — “take your nose off my keyboard” — complement Drake’s braggadocio: “I told my story and made history.” –Alejandra Ramirez
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71. “Going In For Life”

Comeback Season (2007)

This hookless jam relies on some sweet soul samples and the idea of a young, hungry Drake gunning for that number one spot: “If Hov is Jordan, I guess I’m cool with Pippen/ ‘Til I mention I wanna play a new position.” But much like LeBron, the comparisons to Jordan are quickly out of date — they’re just different dudes, and Drizzy proved it even this early. –Adam Kivel
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70. “4422”

More Life

This is the first sign that More Life wouldn’t be all novel, with Sampha’s moody, undersea piano firmly in classic Drake territory, even with no Drake on the tune. An intermission from the choking grasp of Drake on Drake on Drake? OK, maybe that is novel after all. –Dan Weiss

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69. “Plastic Bag”

What a Time To Be Alive (2015)

“Plastic Bag” is the WATTBA track that seems most like a Future track (aside from “Jersey” of course), and surprisingly enough Drake fits into the drug-addled night at the strip club motif fairly well. This is Future’s song for sure, but Drake uses his time to prove his club credibility, flaunting his cash and mixing booze and pills. It’s a far cry from Degrassi, but isn’t everything he does now? No longer the seemingly untainted try-hard rapper from years ago, Drake is capable of being jaded as hell if he so chooses. –Pat Levy
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68. “Two Birds, One Stone”

N/A (2016)

The Diamond-hard rapping is so constant, so devoid of song structure it could pass for a freestyle, in which case it would be one of his best: “I found God and I lost patience,” “Between rocks and hard places of all places” “My mind’s not all there / Carry lots of dead weight like a pallbearer” “Girl I love you but I don’t miss you.” Points docked for the cheap shot at Cudi and not convincing anyone he’s ever visited a prison. –Dan Weiss

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67. “Digital Dash”

What a Time To Be Alive(2015)

What a Time To Be Alive shows Future and Drake’s vast differences, and this shouldn’t come as a surprise given that the project was born out of an impromptu, six-day recording session. On “Digital Dash”, Drake’s forceful, but choppy verses (“You remind me of a quarterback/ That shit is all in the past”) sit uncomfortably next to Future’s rapid-fire, purple-lean-laced delivery. Yet, despite all the shortcomings, the woozy hooks make it one of the best tracks on the album. –Alejandra Ramirez
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66. “Dreams Money Can Buy”

N/A (2011)

Sampling the elusive Jai Paul’s “BTSTU”, “Dreams Money Can Buy” spends half its running time daydreaming and the other half taking subliminal shots. Drake balances his goals with his reality, never becoming too preoccupied with a fantasy to miss reaffirming his star status or that the competition is aging out. “I never seen the car you claim to drive/ Well, shit I seen it, you just ain’t inside/ And I feel like lately it went from Top 5 to Remaining 5/ My favorite rappers either lost it or ain’t alive,” he jabs, conceivably a barb at any number of rappers. It’s a crafty power play. –Sheldon Pearce
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65. “Connect”

Nothing Was the Same (2013)

Several toxic relationships unfold in the margins of the Drake canon, but few are spelled out as explicitly as the one in “Connect”. Here he endures emotional turmoil for the sake of carnal pleasure, a song about the overwhelming power of physical intimacy, how it can simulate a connection. “She just want to run over my feelings like she’s drinking and driving in an 18-wheeler/ And I’d allow her,” he says, hinting at the control she has over him. Everything unfolds in a fog, as he recalls driving on an expired license at the crack of dawn just to hook up. –Sheldon Pearce
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64. “Grammys”

Views (2016)

drake views 6 album stream mp3 listen Ranking: Every Drake Song from Worst to Best

Drake and Future join up yet again, proving it’s still a particularly great time to be alive. As if pumped up by Future hitting the studio, Drake goes after the beat (courtesy of 40 and Southside), lacing it with sharp bars rather than sweetly sung lines. Drake contains multitudes, insisting he doesn’t care about awards, taking shots at haters, referencing his influences, and insisting on his dominance, all in rapid succession. –Adam Kivel
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63. “6 Man”

If You’re Reading This, It’s Too Late (2015)

The best thing about “6 Man” is the Lou Williams reference that kicks off the track, giving the backup point guard the spotlight he so deserved. Those familiar with the NBA gossip mill might remember Williams as the former Raptor who was running with two girlfriends for a short while, a stunt so mighty that even Drake had to pay homage. The worst thing about “6 Man” is Drake’s continued cosign of Guy Fieri, who he inexplicably refers to as a magician during the track. For a guy with relatively refined taste, it’s odd to see Drake fangirl out about a guy who wears gas station Hawaiian shirts. –Pat Levy
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62. “Cameras / Good Ones Go”

Take Care (2011)

This two-parter finds Drake trying to convince a local love interest to stay, even in the face of overwhelming photographic evidence suggesting that he’s still tied to his celebrity girlfriend. On “Cameras”, he blames the media for manufacturing his celebrity romance, implying there’s a tabloid agenda at play. “Baby girl you need to stop it, all that pride and self-esteem/ Got you angry about this girl I’m with in all them magazines/ Baby she look like a star, but only on camera … It looks like we’re in love, but only on camera,” he sings in a half-spoken cadence. On “Good Ones Go”, he softens a bit, realizing that he’s running out of time to woo this woman. –Sheldon Pearce
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61. “Show Me A Good Time”

Thank Me Later (2010)

This one’s simultaneously a torch song for the ladies and an uptempo banger — and, no surprise, it’s produced by none other than Kanye West. “I live for the nights that I can’t remember/ With the people that I won’t forget,” Drake offers. “Show Me a Good Time” sounds like it’s already seen more than a few, and like the perfect score to the next one. –Adam Kivel
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60. “Faithful”

Views (2016)

drake views 6 album stream mp3 listen Ranking: Every Drake Song from Worst to Best

We’ve known for a long time that Drake has good phone game, but this line is a pretty damn good confirmation: “On my way from the studio so get undressed/ Let’s do the things we say on text.” Plus, Drake unites past, present, and future on this one; the dearly departed Pimp C takes the first verse, the current king himself takes the second, and OVO signee dvsn takes the third. –Adam Kivel
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59. “6PM in New York”

If You’re Reading This, It’s Too Late (2015)

“Diss me, you’ll never hear a reply for it,” on 2009’s “Successful”, became a prophecy only to be fulfilled in “6PM in New York”. Undeniably one of Drake’s best diss tracks, the song references lyrics from Kanye’s “Blood on the Leaves”, Kendrick’s “Money Trees”, and Tyga’s “Little Little Homie” only to tear them down in the end. The soft Drake that was once memed seems like a thing of the past as he comes on with full aggression “to prove [he’s] number one over all these niggas.” –Alejandra Ramirez
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58. “Forever”

N/A (2009)

Released as part of the soundtrack for a LeBron James documentary, “Forever” brings Drake together with Kanye, Eminem, and Lil Wayne for a track that initially doesn’t really seem like much more than a song that plays while picking teams in an NBA 2K game. To have such a stacked lineup and end up with this song is a bit disappointing to be frank. Sure, this is a great song for high school football players to listen to while getting pumped for a game, but a song that brings these hip-hop stalwarts together should be absolutely essential, which this is not. That being said, Drake’s verse shines above the rest, which makes “Forever” a high-water mark of sorts for him. Outperforming three of the biggest rappers in the game solidified Drake as an artist who clearly had the potential to be the top dog in rap. –Pat Levy
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57. “Get It Together”

More Life

This is where More Life really gets going, with its unusual popping beat, and Jorja Smith executing one of the most soulful cameos ever on a Drake record, the elegant piano’s cue to match. If only it were more quotable than “You need to get that shit together / So we could get together.” But the two harmonizing is far more obviously something to behold than it reads on paper. It’s a better thing his music than his reviews that Drake’s moving away from how things read on paper. –Dan Weiss
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56. “Still Here”

Views (2016)

drake views 6 album stream mp3 listen Ranking: Every Drake Song from Worst to Best

Somehow, “Still Here” finds Drake comparing himself to Steph Curry, referencing the Star of David, and explaining about how his crew lives so well because they support each other. Sounds like someone on my rec league basketball team getting too amped up in a late-game situation, but somehow Drizzy still pulls it off remarkably well –Adam Kivel
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55. “Skepta Interlude”

More Life

Few men of the world actually start acting like men of the world, and VIEWS was a truly bizarre claustrophobic exercise interspersed with trop-house, Afropop- and reggae-tinged dance cuts. Ceding a track to grime cause celebré Skepta for two and a half minutes of the protégé’s sharpest flows is one way to let the light in. –Dan Weiss

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54. “Pound Cake / Paris Morton Music 2”

Nothing Was the Same (2013)

There was a lot of expectation set up on “Pound Cake/ Paris Morton Music 2”, being that this would be the third time Drake and Jay Z had collaborated on each other’s albums and would serve as the much anticipated follow-up to “Paris Morton Music”. If anything, the track just proves how crucial Boi-1da’s mellow and haunting production is crucial to Drake’s sound. Jay’s verse is honestly a lazy walk around the park, but Drake’s no-gimmick and overly cool flow shows the true clarity of his vision. –Alejandra Ramirez
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53. “Hype”

Views (2016)

drake views 6 album stream mp3 listen Ranking: Every Drake Song from Worst to Best

“Hype” hits hard, but it sticks out like a sore thumb on Views. It’s strange to think that it might’ve ranked higher had it been released on its own, but … no, it’s a gritty punch to the gut that works well as a smoldering, tough track, all “don’t fuck with me” tude. But it still lacks the depth and expressive strength of the tracks that outstrip it. –Adam Kivel
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52. “Madonna”

If You’re Reading This, It’s Too Late (2015)

If You’re Reading This, It’s Too Late features some of the most darkly ominous beats since Drake’s earlier work on So Far Gone. This all comes thanks to Drake’s longtime producer, Noah “40” Shebib. “Madonna” boasts minimal and minor key piano notes and turbulent electronics that coalesce into an eerie soundscape. Despite the codeine-hazed hook, there’s a classic Drake flow that makes it feel like it’s 2009 again. –Alejandra Ramirez
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51. “Fake Love”

More Life

In which Drake makes paranoia fun, with sticky steel drums tuned to post-Chance, post-Lemonade New Orleans gospel. More than anything on the new record, “Fake Love” encapsulates what Drake does better than anyone. –Dan Weiss
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50. “Diamonds Dancing”

What a Time To Be Alive (2015)

Petty Drake strikes in a big way on What a Time To Be Alive standout “Diamonds Dancing”, committing the entire two-minute outro to take shots at a girl who dared to stop talking to him. By the end of the outro, the listener might feel like they need to apologize to Drake too; the way he repeats “doing me dirty” and “ungrateful” starts to ring through your ears like a guilty conscience. “Diamonds Dancing” is structured in such a way that a comfort zone can’t be established within the track, ping-ponging from Future’s more lighthearted focus on drugs and women to Drake’s smarmy R&B. It’s a bit jarring, but it works, like much of WATTBA. –Pat Levy
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49. “HYFR”

Take Care (2011)

“HYFR” proves why Drake and Lil’ Wayne make such an awesome team, and I don’t think there’s a catchier hook on Take Care than Lil’ Wayne’s hook on the song. Not only that but it boasts some of Drake’s most quotable lines, including the infamous “All my exes live in Texas like I’m George Strait.” But the most impressive? Drake shows off verbal acrobatics in the vicious opening verse that could even make Busta Rhymes proud. –Alejandra Ramirez
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48. “We’ll Be Fine”

Take Care (2011)

Take Care was such a deep album that “We’ll Be Fine” didn’t even make the cut through eight singles. The fiery 40/T-Minus production glitches and thumps, and the hook drips with the smirk of a man proving his haters wrong. The Birdman outro hasn’t aged quite as well considering the trouble between the Cash Money honcho and Drake’s running mate, Lil Wayne, but the track still kicks ass if you just fade out before that starts. –Adam Kivel
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47. “5AM in Toronto”

N/A (2013)

The long-running series where Drake raps at a certain time from a certain place has produced some of his greatest bar-for-bar exchanges. On “5AM in Toronto”, he raps with real venom, appraising the rap landscape and his place in it. When every song sounds like Drake featuring Drake, the real Drake gets irritable. What unfolds in the aftermath is a flurry of punches reaffirming his position in the hierarchy. “You underestimated greatly/ Most number ones ever, how long did it really take me?/ The part I love most is they need me more than they hate me/ So they never take shots, I got everybody on safety,” he raps. When building a case for Drake as a formidable rapper, you start here. — Sheldon Pearace
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46. “The Language”

Nothing Was the Same (2013)

There’s something so insular about Nothing Was the Same, but that’s okay: Loneliness has always been Drake’s best friend. “The Language”, just like the rest of the album, is very reductive, and it seems like the 40/Drake production duo wanted to take a step backwards from the stuffy and maximalist Take Care. Cold and isolated, Drake raps: “I can’t even listen, you wildin’/ I’d much rather sit here in silence.” –Alejandra Ramirez
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45. “Trust Issues”

N/A (2011)

“Trust Issues” is the version of “I’m on One” the world deserved, stripped of all the rap machismo (and two iffy verses from Lil Wayne and Rick Ross) and riddled with social anxiety. It embodies its title, overly cautious, and even a little insecure. “You know what I’m sippin’/ I’ll teach you how to mix it/ But you’re the only one because I don’t trust these bitches,” Drake croons. He has always had a knack for writing paranoia (this is the guy who checks ladies’ phones when they’re in the bathroom, after all), and this is perhaps the best example of that. His melodies trail off into the empty space of this open production, as he grows increasingly suspicious of those around him. –Sheldon Pearce
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44. “Furthest Thing”

Nothing Was the Same (2013)

Drake has never had a problem with intimacy, just commitment. And he is probably one of the few rappers that can rap about his shitty commitment issues on a nearly five-minute song and still somehow make you feel bad for him, or at least sympathize with him. Why? “Because [he’s] the furthest thing from perfect like everyone [he] knows.” –Alejandra Ramirez

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43. “Portland”

More Life

Quavo is truly qualified to talk about not letting other rappers ride your wave, but it’s nice to see him getting his due on Drake’s record the same year Migos conquered the Culture. Migos’ no-nonsense hook repetition is well-represented in the addictive recorder loop, as well as random boasts of being “Michael Phelps with the tennis shoes.” It’s basically a Migos song on a Drake record, and not unwelcome for it. –Dan Weiss
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42. “Summer Sixteen”

N/A (2016)

Now stepping up to the plate and pointing towards the center field bleachers is Drake Ruth, calling his shot, staking his claim on the titular timeframe as the dominant hip-hop presence. With Views due to drop shortly, Drake sent out this warning shot before untitled unmastered. and The Life of Pablo hit the streets. It’ll be interesting to see if Drake can back up the bluster with an album that has us forgetting the two essential hip-hop records that are currently hogging the rap world’s attention. –Pat Levy
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41. “From Time”

Nothing Was the Same (2013)

“From Time” works in the smoothest of the smooth, combining the buttery vocals of Jhene Aiko, lush keys from Chilly Gonzales, and a snap-along rhythm from 40. But of course the smoothest aspect are the verses from the name on the jacket; the confessional lines about getting high with his dad, using his mom’s debit card, and his relationship troubles all go down easy. –Adam Kivel
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40. “Scholarships”

What a Time To Be Alive (2015)

“Wake up and pray every morning/ Demons, they callin my soul,” Drake and Future each offer on the hook to “Scholarships”. The song’s title is a little misleading — I guess they ball so hard that they’re getting scholarships for it? The track, though, has a darkness laced through it, as epitomized by that seemingly inconsequential line. For Future, it’s the drug addiction, relationship troubles, and the struggle for greatness that likely fuels both of those. For Drake, though, it’s another problem: “I need acknowledgment,” he admits, in an impressively honest self-assessment. For everything great he’s boasted about, there’s a fear and uncertainty that he’s able to elucidate, an endearing and sympathetic hook that justifies his career. –Adam Kivel
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39. “Free Smoke”

More Life

More Life’s opening bid evolves from the sulky “almost gave up on the music thing” to the overdue epiphany that he’s way too rich to pity himself anymore. Along the way he drunk-texts J. Lo at least one phone number ago, wonders again why women who used to ignore him find him adorable, and brings the game to its knees. –Dan Weiss
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38. “One Dance”

Views (2016)

drake views 6 album stream mp3 listen Ranking: Every Drake Song from Worst to Best

Seriously, Drake ought to write a track with Lionel Richie. Or maybe just mash them up. Drake’s version of dancehall sits suspiciously close to those ‘80s gems, and that’s meant as a sincere compliment. “One Dance” sits alongside “Hotline Bling” well, but works better when you keep from comparing it to that mega-jam. It’s sweet, groovy, and endearing. –Pat Levy
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37. “Can I”

N/A (2015)

The absolute audacity that it took for Drake to have our Lord and Savior Beyoncé on a track doing nothing more than speaking the hook? It’s just remarkable. Even more remarkable is that the track doesn’t suffer from a lack of Beyoncé, but holds up as a dope collaboration. Among Drake’s loosies, this ranks near the top, but he was smart to realize it wasn’t likely an album track. A minimalist beat, a pinch of Beyoncé, and some call-and-response rhymes amount to an engaging one-off. –Pat Levy
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36. “Views”

Views (2016)

drake views 6 album stream mp3 listen Ranking: Every Drake Song from Worst to Best

The sprawling closer to Views might be a little cheeseball, but this is Drake, so who are we kidding? Another call for loyalty and laud for all the crew support, this one succeeds on the back of Maneesh’s sped-up, soul-sampling production and Drake’s absolute sincerity. He closes on the ultimate example of that: “I might take a breather, but I won’t ever leave you/ If I was you, I wouldn’t like me either.” It’s a powerfully arranged conclusion to an album that needed just that. –Adam Kivel
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35. “Big Rings”

If You’re Reading This, It’s Too Late (2015)

A bonus track to the surprise physical release of an unexpected mixtape, “My Side” could’ve been about as superfluous as a rap track could possibly be. But instead, this Boi-1da-produced slow-burner finds Drake indulging his singing style on the hook (in which the end of each line falls a few notes off a monotone, rather than crooning the whole way) and pushing the verse with a punch. –Adam Kivel
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34. “Childs Play”

Views (2016)

drake views 6 album stream mp3 listen Ranking: Every Drake Song from Worst to Best

Luckily, “Childs Play” isn’t Drake comparing himself to a killer doll. Instead, he rants about the Cheesecake Factory, how much he likes it, and how he wants to just go there and enjoy it instead of getting into a fight with his date. Stars: They’re just like us! The 40/Metro Boomin beat is great, the hook is goofy fun, but nothing beats that chain-restaurant-lovin’ line: “Why you gotta fight with me at Cheesecake/ You know I love to go there.” –Adam Kivel
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33. “Legend”

If You’re Reading This, It’s Too Late (2015)

This slow-cooker serves as the perfect opening for If You’re Reading This, a transitional work and a transfixing moment in which a more aggressive and toughened Drake offers up almost ridiculous but somehow believable thoughts. “If I die, all I know is I’m a mothafuckin’ legend,” he sings in a dazed and lethargic manner. “It’s too late for my city, I’m the youngest nigga reppin’.” The vocals are slow and sprawled out enough to be deliberate and exultant, as he sings under a distant soul sample and skittered percussion joints. In all its bombast, though, there’s something so lonely and hollow; while others may not believe in his legendary status, he may be the only one that believes in himself. –Alejandra Ramirez
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32. “Star67”

If You’re Reading This, It’s Too Late (2015)

“Star67” has an unmistakable energy, a self-serious tone that Drake often reaches for but rarely achieves with this sort of success. At first glance, a Drake song called “Star67” seems like it would be some sappy ballad about Drake pining for a girl and anonymously dialing her up to check on her whereabouts or something of that ilk, but instead it’s a statement from Drake that implores the listener to take him seriously. The opening to the first verse seems like it’s aimed squarely at Cash Money label magnate Birdman, with Drake clearly offput by the lack of respect he’s receiving from his label. The point of If You’re Reading was to drop a surprise mixtape that would free Drake from his Cash Money responsibilities, a seemingly unsanctioned album dropped in the lap of Birdman that he had no choice but to accept as Drake’s final effort for the label (hence the mixtape’s title). “Star67” feels like the mission statement for the mixtape, a strong showing from Drake that proved he wasn’t one to be fucked with. –Pat Levy
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31. “Glow”

More Life

This is the moment Drake does for Kanye what he’s already been doing for Wayne: takes care of him. Ye’s needed a friend for a while now, and who better than a fellow narcissist who can’t go home again? This big, spacious, grandiose hug of a chorus is just the thing for his post-Pablo, post-Trump, post-Kim(?) depression. Drake as soul-healing balm, and you know Chance is jealous. –Dan Weiss
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30. “Started From the Bottom”

Nothing Was the Same (2013)

Much like Drake, I feel I need to keep it real from the jump. I didn’t much care for Drake’s early stuff as it was happening. I was young and steadfast in my opinions, and Drake was just not for me. “Started from the Bottom” changed that in a huge way, totally flipping me to a Drake fan. The track represented an emergence from the subpar to the sublime that felt like it captured Drake in a very honest way. Coming from nothing, you might feel inclined to keep your friends close because they’re essentially all you have. Drake showcases his extreme loyalty once again by letting everyone know that even though his status has totally changed, his relationships won’t be affected. The fact that he lets OB have an interlude in the music video to try out his comedy chops should be proof alone that Drake is totally content sharing the spotlight with his close friends. –Pat Levy
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29. “Come Thru”

Nothing Was the Same (2013)

“We’ve got things to do,” has never sounded like a pickup line before, but after “Come Thru”, it’s got to have become a go-to for more than a few Drake-indebted dudes. Drizzy spends the length of this one talking to a girl he used to know, insisting that they get back together and spend some time. But the reality is she’s been with someone else this whole time, rather than sitting around waiting for him. That won’t keep Drake down, though, as he insists that she deserves some rounds — drinks on him or successive physical moments like a boxing match. Either way, he’s offering to “pour you up a drink and let you burn something,” a recipe for a hazy evening. –Adam Kivel
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28. “Underground Kingz”

Take Care (2011)

A tribute to the late Pimp C of UGK (or Underground Kingz), this gem allows Drake to flex the Southern muscles he relied more heavily on for his first mixtape, but ties it into the Toronto love he has become known for. Inspired by the legend’s passing, Drake digs into his relationship with his father, the Memphis drummer Larry Graham, his Southern roots, and the relationship rap culture has on young men. But he makes sure to note that he does it all for his city, for Toronto, and that he’ll never stop trying to put it on the map, even to his death. “People always ask how I got my nice things/ Take my crown to the grave, I’m an underground king,” he raps, tying his own personal history and an important era of rap all together in an impeccable track. –Adam Kivel
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27. “Blem”

More Life

In this wonderfully sparse, Dawn Richard-esque (to name but one artist who deserves the high marks this guy’s gotten) dancehall-‘n’-b cut, Drake manages to turn “I might just say how I feel” into more than a threat than a promise. “You’re crazy sometimes / And I only see you sometimes” could’ve been a Promise Ring lyric on Very Emergency, though they wouldn’t have switched tack to talk spray tans. –Dan Weiss

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26. “Worst Behavior”

Nothing Was the Same (2013)

One of Drake’s more complex recent songs, “Worst Behavior” might seem like an ode to stunting and running with a small, loyal crew at first glance, but there’s also a bit of family therapy happening here. Despite Drake’s dad showing up in the video to look good in some dope suits and lip sync the lyrics, Drake uses the song to confront his dad about his lack of support in his youth and his reappearance in Drake’s now successful life to seemingly carve off his slice of the Christmas roast. Also in the realm of family-centric rhymes, Drake drops one of the best Jewish rapper lines of all time: “Bar mitzvah money like my last name Mordecai/ Fuck you bitch, I’m more than high.” Let me know when anyone comes close to that. DJ Dahi’s sample-less beat is likely the best work of his career, another example of Drake getting in with the right people at the right time. –Pat Levy

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25. “Too Good”

Views (2016)

drake views 6 album stream mp3 listen Ranking: Every Drake Song from Worst to Best

The best pop track of an undeniably pop album, “Too Good” once again finds Drake and Rihanna teaming up for some magic. Following on the vibe of RiRi’s smash “Work”, the duo get on an island vibe, Drake even testing out his best patois — which we can talk about appropriation, but at least he seems to be showing a sincere interest and appreciation for the style. Few are the pop songs in which the pre-hook could stand on its own and be a hit, only to be followed by an even bigger hook, and “Too Good” is one. –Adam Kivel

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24. “How About Now”

If You’re Reading This, It’s Too Late (2015)

Arguably the pettiest song in the Drake canon, “How Bout Now” is a dissertation on holding grudges. Over a warped sample of Jodeci’s “My Heart Belongs to U”, he celebrates being successful enough to be one of his ex’s biggest misfires, relishing the opportunity to rub her nose in his good fortune. This is the song you can only write if you win. He guilt trips, he flashes back, he relives how she wronged him. Her main transgression: Not enjoying his music. “I had no money left from actin’, I was focused on the music/ I used to always try and burn you CDs of my new shit/ You be like, ‘Who’s this?’ I be like, ‘Me, girl’/ You be like, ‘Oh, word, true shit’/ Then ask if we could listen to Ludacris/ Them car rides made me feel like I was losin’ it,” he raps, distraught. Few rappers have ever been this good at playing the victim or at channeling resentment into a not-so-subtle flex. –Sheldon Pearce
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23. “All Me”

Nothing Was the Same (2013)

“Came up, that’s all me, stay true, that’s all me/ No help, that’s all me, all me for real,” Drake offers in the hook, justifying all of the braggadocio that will follow. If you don’t like him, at least you have to respect his work ethic, he seems to be arguing. And those brags include sleeping with the woman who had been his babysitter, cashing eight advance checks, and being the light-skinned Keith Sweat. But it’s one of his absolute best one-liners that steals the show: “Look, just understand that I’m on a roll like Cottonelle/ I was made for all of this shit.” Key Wane flips and distorts an Abbey Lincoln R&B sample, her call of “It’s my man” turned into a dark, pitched-down menace. –Adam Kivel
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22. “Feel No Ways”

Views (2016)

drake views 6 album stream mp3 listen Ranking: Every Drake Song from Worst to Best

The old-school R&B vibe of Views hits a real highlight on “Feel No Ways”, a track that sounds crafted from excavated percussion samples and the piano that Tom Hanks and Robert Loggia danced on in Big. The Jordan Ullman-produced track is a real charmer, tripping and tumbling around an ‘80s pastel landscape. “I tried with you,” Drake offers. “There’s more to life than sleeping in and getting high with you.” That line will get used so many times in breakup texts over the next few months. –Adam Kivel
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21. “Madiba Riddim”

More Life

On one of More Life’s biggest peaks, Drake’s worldwide success with “One Dance” didn’t satisfy his captivation with the Afropop guitar sound, he unfurls rich hook after hook over his most delicate loops ever, and almost each includes a pearl of wisdom. He’s trying not to be “fool for the money.” He can’t tell who his friends are. He really does understand that people change, even exes. God knows he’s trying. He subverts Views and even “Hotline Bling” in every way by trying to view the world from a less possessive place, and his music is better for it, almost as good as it is that he discovered highlife and soukous. –Dan Weiss
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20. “Take Care”

Take Care (2011)

“Take Care” is interesting in that it’s one of those songs off the album that can be heard while sulking under the covers, crying about your ex, or at the club while you’re dancing with someone you may have just met off Tinder. This is probably possible thanks to Jamie XX’s subtle house production, with the constant, pounding bass drum and minimal piano melody. The Gil-Scott Heron-sampled dance buildup peaks while Drake and Rihanna describe the broken paths that lead, eventually, to a lasting relationship. Rihanna’s vocal performance gorgeously lifts the somber mood. It’s even more interesting that, during that time, the song seemed to tell Drake and RihRih’s real-life fling. –Alejandra Ramirez
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19. “Make Me Proud”

Take Care (2011)

Drake and Nicki Minaj have a longstanding connection as the perennial load-bearers for Lil Wayne’s Young Money imprint, but the only time that relationship has manifested itself as chemistry on wax is on “Make Me Proud”, where Drake plays cheerleader. He’s got a very particular woman in mind, and he describes her down to the last detail. Nicki isn’t necessarily the specific object of his affection here, but she is the type of woman he pines after, the type he’s proud of. And how couldn’t he be — she outraps and outperforms him (as with the majority of their collaborations), stuttering through before hunkering down into singsong. This dual sense of perspective, specifically the presence of an active female voice, brings the song to life. –Sheldon Pearce
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18. “Know Yourself”

If You’re Reading This, It’s Too Late (2015)

If you haven’t been in a crowded club, bar, concert venue, or house party when the “Running through the 6 with my woes” drop hits, you haven’t properly lived. (Also, were you hibernating in 2015?) “Know Yourself” might be one of Drake’s most memorable tracks for that now iconic drop alone, with as much of the song’s success owed to producer Boi-1da as to Drake. If you really break it down, a lot of the “Know Yourself” lyrics are intersquad referential, with Drake shouting out people who only true OVO heads are going to know. Relatively unknown people with flashy names like Ethan and Jibba maybe don’t have a place in the larger cultural lexicon, but Drake’s insistence on bringing the whole crew to the top with him is one of his more endearing qualities. I’ve long felt that an Entourage remake based around Drake would be a profitable entity that HBO can surely have if they’d like — but upon further reflection, I think Drake’s entourage might be too big. Sure, Ethan is E and Jibba is Turtle (and OB is Drama, of course), but Entourage was a show about four close friends on a roller coaster ride of celebrity, while Drake’s crew seems to run about 20 people deep. Still, the value placed in loyalty in OVO is extremely evident, especially on “Know Yourself”. –Pat Levy
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17. “Headlines”

Take Care (2011)

It’s fitting that “Headlines” was the second single released after “Marvin’s Room” for Take Care. While “Marvin’s Room” is more melancholic, “Headlines” doesn’t show any hint of despair as the song’s pop infectiousness almost finishes as fast as it begins, staying true to its title. The production is upbeat and features layered staccato synth lines, all while Drake contently ruminates on the ups and downs of fame: “Overdosed on confidence/ Starting not to give a fuck and stop fearing the consequence.” While the vamped-up conviction doesn’t seem to predict the album’s brooding and overly emotional style, Drake is always ready to please. –Alejandra Ramirez
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16. “Jungle”

If You’re Reading This, It’s Too Late (2015)

So, Gabriel Garzón Montaro’s hook (“Rock me real slowly/ Put a bib on me/ I’m just like a baby, drooling over you/ The things you do”) isn’t for everybody. There was some debate over it within our rankings; some found the child-play a little too creepy, but the slow jam smoothness of the rest of the track is so undeniable that it overpowered even those questions. There’s a grit to the track, elucidated by the fact that the song details a relationship with a woman that lives in a dangerous area and Drake’s willingness to risk it all to rekindle it. “Jungle” essentially closes If You’re Reading This, capturing the lust, love, determination, and growth that the album — and Drake’s career — focuses on. –Adam Kivel
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15. “Too Much”

Nothing Was the Same (2013)

With some help from Sampha, Drake tackles his fears on “Too Much”, writing about the anxieties that come with chasing historic greatness and how that pursuit impacts personal relationships. Packing cadences with heavy internal rhyme schemes, he pens an open letter to his loved ones, especially his mother and uncle with trepidation in his voice. “Money got my whole family going backwards/ No dinners, no holidays, no nothing/ There’s issues at hand that we’re not discussing,” he raps, torn between trying to be a great rapper and a good son. It’s deeply introspective and rapped with purpose, as if part of a family intervention. Lingering frustration and a budding sense of futility help to produce some of Drake’s sharpest storytelling. –Sheldon Pearce
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14. “Lose You”

More Life

One of More Life’s biggest highlights is mesmeric, name-checking Trick Daddy and Trina, cheekily calls his Canadian ass “America’s Most Wanted,” and prefers glory to honor. All of that’s in the first minute, and the star-glint gospel piano vying for supremacy with swirling-candy synth is delirious fun as well as a brain-warming earbud experience. More emotionally, it turns out he cares about whether he lost us with Views, a curious quandary from a guy who likely juiced its numbers. His most Kanye track ever, and that’s a deep compliment. Could’ve fit right onto Graduation. –Dan Weiss
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13. “Pop Style”

Views (2016)

I’m not the first to say it, but Drake cut Kanye and Jay Z out of a track and made it better. The Throne didn’t fit this beat — Jay was too smooth, Ye was too sharp. The lazy intensity (oxymoron, I know) of Drake’s flow just fits Sevn Thomas and Frank Dukes’ steely, deteriorating beat perfectly, and his verses are full of memorable lines. Comparing himself to “Chaining Tatum”? Quoting Justin Timberlake? Insisting he needs a Number One hit? Pick your favorite line and you likely won’t match with the next three people you poll. –Adam Kivel
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12. “Weston Road Flows”

Views (2016)

drake views 6 album stream mp3 listen Ranking: Every Drake Song from Worst to Best

I don’t think anybody else could try to quote a shoe-based meme and have the line wind up sitting in a prime position on a track this good. But Drake has always been in special touch with internet culture, one of the meme-iest dudes in the game. Drake’s entirely verse-y flow stretches for over four minutes (!) and never loses interest, instead distilling pure nostalgia and serving it up in a warm cup with a side of Mary J. Blige. If this one doesn’t make you like Drake at least a little, if not as an artist then as a dude, then nothing will. –Adam Kivel
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11. “Back To Back”

N/A (2015)

You might notice we haven’t ranked Meek Mill’s songs, but after this absolute ether, you shouldn’t be surprised. Even if you didn’t know this was a diss track, you could listen to “Back to Back” as an absolute jam. 40’s production alone would make this the kind of thing you’d want to play over and over again, but one listen and you’ll find yourself repeating the song’s title for days. But then dig into Drake’s lines and you’ll get an extra dose of amazement. There’s not a wasted line in the bunch, Drizzy shooting down Mill’s entire career, from his slot on girlfriend Nicki Minaj’s tour (“This ain’t what she meant when she told you to open up more”) to his hardcore persona (“Yeah, trigger fingers turn to twitter fingers/ Yeah, you gettin’ bodied by a singin’ nigga”). Everyone — except maybe Mill — has played this one back to back, and for good reason. –Adam Kivel
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10. “Passionfruit”

More Life

Low-key, false-start disco that would’ve made sense on Jai Paul’s not-actually-released album, actually discusses tension between equals rather than Drake sketching a defenseless bystander of his typically condescending reportage. And it’s got a tune, intoned in a soft voice even for him. It doesn’t sound like a pose, a bonus. When he says not to pick up the pieces and just leave them for now, he sounds like an artist, an owner of his proclivities who truly wants to stare into broken glass. –Dan Weiss
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09. “Marvin’s Room”

Take Care (2011)

Drake’s got plenty of songs delivered from the midst of hedonism, in which he explains that all the partying is distracting him from the love that he needs and misses — but this one’s the apex. On “Marvin’s Room”, Drake reproduces a conversation with an ex-girlfriend, in which both are a little drunk and a little unclear about whether things are really over. Well, she’s a little unclear, and he’s a lot unclear. Sure, he’s out partying with other women, and he’s had sex four times this week, and he’s got the cash to pay for stuff for all these supposedly unimportant flings — but he’s really depressed about it, and the girl on the other end of the line is the one that matters. And this time, he actually used the other side of the phone call; Ericka Lee’s voice opens the track, explaining her long night of partying (“I don’t know, I’m delirious”). They’re in the same place, on the same level, doing the same things, but not together. To nail that point down even further, Lee sued Drake over the use of her voice. There’s a fragile intensity to the track, as evidenced by 40’s beat, gritty yet sparse, a cool, blue glow emanating from the thing like a staticky TV screen in a dark room. –Adam Kivel
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08. “Hotline Bling”

N/A (2015)

Is there honestly any other recent song catchier than “Hotline Bling”? Released in August, I still hear this song non-stop on the radio. First debuted on Apple Music alongside two Meek Mill disses, this song became a massive hit. Plus, the inescapable music video generated a cultural trend of seriously funny covers, deadpan Vines, and hilarious memes and gifs. The only reason “Hotline Bling” failed to reach No. 1 was Adele’s re-emergence with the massive pop single “Hello”. What’s even better is that the lyrics channel a younger and more insecure Drake, the Drake that caught you in your feelings circa Take Care and before. This is the Drake that reminisces on past flings and on that girl who “used to stay at home” instead of “going where [she] don’t belong.” This is Drake in his typical “Girl, I know you better than you know yourself” flow, which he always seems to do best. –Alejandra Ramirez
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07. “Jumpman”

What a Time To Be Alive (2015)

“Jumpman” is the most commercial song in Drake’s discography, mostly because the entire song is a Nike commercial. That doesn’t stop the What a Time To Be Alive track from deserving this spot near the top of the list. This song was a watershed moment for Drake, an artist who in recent years has partially made his living by attaching himself to hot new artists for a remix or a couple loosies so as to boost his relevance. The fact that Drake could make an entire mixtape with Future, an incredible rapper who was flirting with mainstream success but not quite grasping it, and from that mixtape could come arguably the song of summer 2015 proved that Drake had become hip-hop’s official tastemaker. Drake cosigning Future feels like one of his most entrepreneurial moves yet, and “Jumpman” is the goose that laid the golden egg. And don’t forget, the inclusion of the now ubiquitous “If Young Metro don’t trust you I’m gon’ shoot you” drop on “Jumpman” was what pushed Metro Boomin into the spotlight, and thank god for that. –Pat Levy
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06. “Tuscan Leather”

Nothing Was the Same (2013)

One of the greatest opening songs in rap album history, “Tuscan Leather” is a bold, confident statement of self, a six-minute epic of beat changes, reckless rhymes, and self-aware depth. Drake had been rising for years, but this song cemented his ascension. He references Cappadonna and college basketball, admits his personal failings in his connection with Nicki Minaj, and utilizes a chipmunked Whitney Houston sample (courtesy, of course, of 40). “This is nothing for the radio/ But they’ll still play it, though,” he rhymes in the opening verse, and it’s absolutely true. Drake has done so many things that the traditional rap world might raise an eyebrow at, and yet he has come to dominate. –Adam Kivel
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05. “No Tellin’”

If You’re Reading This, It’s Too Late (2015)

In hindsight, the outro to “No Tellin’” almost seems to foreshadow his feud with Meek Mill and its inevitable outcome: “I gotta keep watchin’ for oppers cause anything’s possible, yeah/ There’s no code of ethics out here, anyone will take shots at you, yeah/ Niggas think they can come take what I got, let’s be logical, yeah,” he casually offers. It proved to be true. “No Tellin’” suggests Drake has no ceiling and no peers. It pitches Drake as corporate rap that’s too big to fail.

If Meek confirmed anything, it’s that Drake’s self-efficacy (paired with his ability to undercut and exploit any personality flaw) has made him nearly impossible to stop. “Please do not speak to me like I’m that Drake from four years ago/ I’m at a higher place,” he spits. He continues to ascend. Over deflating synths, Drake settles into an infectious singsong and proves the sky’s the limit. –Sheldon Pearce
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04. “10 Bands”

If You’re Reading This, It’s Too Late (2015)

Even amid ghostwriting allegations, “10 Bands” stands as one of the strongest Drake songs to date. If anything, Quentin Miller sleepwalking through the alleged reference track has given the song new life, further proving how far Drake has come as a performer and entertainer. He stunts throughout, selling the boasts on sheer energy. Miller could never treat Diamonds of Atlanta like it’s King of Diamonds; it’s Drake’s status that forces the listener to buy in. Therein lies the magic: The context of Drake rapping the lyrics changes the way they’re perceived and, in a certain sense, what they mean. With an assist from Sevn Thomas, Boi-1da delivers a thumper and Drake flexes into it. This is checking your account balance when you’re backed by Nike and Apple. –Sheldon Pearce
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03. “Energy”

If You’re Reading This, It’s Too Late (2015)

The shotgun cocks and machine-gun spits in “Energy” signal that Too Late is introducing a new Drake, one that’s grown up from the naiveté of his early work and giving the middle finger to all his critics and haters. The gunshots nod to a more abrasive approach: “I got rap niggas that I gotta act like I like … But my actin’ days are over, fuck them niggas for life.” Ominous, sparse keys make for cold production that bolsters Drake’s icy sentiments: “They tryna take the wave from a nigga/ Fuckin’ with the kid and pray for your nigga.” At the end, Drake is resilient — and why wouldn’t he be? He has a multitude of chart-topping singles, a Grammy, and an ever-growing fan base. He gets the last laugh, comes in with a new beretta, and lets it go. –Alejandra Ramirez
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02. “0 to 100 / The Catchup”

N/A (2015)

This track is the most transparent Drake has ever been about being two distinct artists mashed up into one Canadian body. He kicks things off with a two-and-a-half-minute flow of near constant braggadocios before transitioning into mellow R&B, lamenting the difficulties of being one of the biggest rappers in the world. It’s tough to decide which part of the song holds up better. There’s a top-notch James Blake sample that carries the second half, and Drake shouts out Steph Curry (in 2014 no less) and his wife Ayesha — specifically for being a great cook, and now Ayesha Curry has a cooking show, so you tell me how that happened. As far as loosies go, this might be one of the all-time greats. Preceding If You’re Reading This, It’s Too Late, “0-100/ The Catch Up” set the tone for Drake’s next couple of years. This song was when he declared himself to be damn near the top of the game, if he wasn’t there already, and it felt like the first moment he was actually right about that. –Pat Levy
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01. “Hold On, We’re Going Home”

Nothing Was the Same (2013)

While talented, Drake isn’t the most technically skilled rapper, and “Hold On, We’re Going Home” is proof that, at times, he fares better when singing. One of rap’s biggest pop crossover stars, Drake seems like the only rap artist capable of releasing an R&B slow jam, without rapping, that could become an instant classic.

For once, Drake isn’t moping about the past on “the best [he] ever had” or how a girl “could do better.” He’s in the present, wanting someone whom he can look forward to a future with. Its immediacy and intimacy smoothly reverberate, as he channels his inner Marvin Gaye: “You’re everything that I see,” he sings, starry-eyed. “I want your hot love and emotion endlessly.” Even Majid Jordan gives a retro impression in the Arthur Russell vibe that fits well into the song’s soulfulness and warmth.

The song’s simplicity drew the attention of Lykke Li, Blood Orange, and others who performed their own rendition. Those covers proved further that, at its core, “Hold On, We’re Going Home” is a perfect pop song, Drake’s songbook standard. Some may call him soft, but in moments like these, it doesn’t seem to really matter. –Alejandra Ramirez

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