Rank and File
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Ranking: Every Foo Fighters Song from Worst to Best

100. “Outside”

Sonic Highways (2014)

Most of the songs on Sonic Highways suffer from disparity — of the musical guest never fully gelling with the Foo Fighters’ sound. “Outside” has the opposite problem. Joe Walsh blends in so well with the MOR Foo track, it never justifies its own existence. Where’s the talkbox? Where’s the flair? Somebody call Don Felder. –Dan Caffrey

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99. “Lonely as You”

One by One (2002)

Grohl once likened “Lonely as You” to Sgt. Peppers Lonely Hearts Club Band; or rather, he discussed the album in the context of the song’s pseudo metal vibes. Don’t scoff. Listen long enough and you actually start to see where he was coming from. In the background, right before the chorus, the guitars seem to rain down these little harmonies that are very akin to George Harrison’s work. But The Beatles were fabulous — hence, the Fab Four moniker — and this song’s more fit than fabulous. In other words, the track blends well with One by One and not so much anywhere else. –Michael Roffman

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98. “End Over End”

In Your Honor (2005)

…I’m circling. Middle-of-the-road Foo that wears out its welcome despite a welcoming beginning. It’s a song about repeating mistakes, but unfortunately the track is repetitive as F. More like “Never end over and over never end over and over never end…” –Justin Gerber

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97. “Miss the Misery”

Wasting Light (2011)

Tucked towards the back of Wasting Light, “Miss the Misery” probably isn’t the track that first comes to mind when most fans think about the album. However, the cut contains the lyrics that lend the record its title: “Don’t change your mind/ You’re wastin’ light/ Get in and let’s go, go.” For a group pushing AARP age in band years, you gotta believe this is a regular mantra for Grohl and the Foos. Or a reminder to switch off the lights when exiting their tour bus. Both are important. –Matt Melis
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96. “Happy Ever After (Zero Hour)”

Concrete and Gold (2017)

A pretty tune that’s easy to make fun of, since it sits sonically between Donovan and “Hey There Delilah,” but this delicate ditty still does a good job of illustrating how much interest Concrete and Gold has in melodies and harmonies. Those kind of textures aren’t exactly the blunt Grohl’s stock in trade, and it’s nice to hear him challenging himself some, even if the result is merely pleasant. –Dan Weiss
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95. “Come Alive”

Echoes, Silence, Patience and Grace (2007)

The best thing that can be said about “Come Alive” is that its journey ultimately proves worth taking. By the second half of the song’s five minutes, the drums kick in and the song finds a distinct direction. The problem is the song’s first half, which takes its time getting to the point, might lose listeners in its meandering. –Philip Cosores

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94. “Bangin'”

“The Pretender” single

Given the drum metaphor of the title and the lyrics’ fear about a relationship growing stale, the repetition seems very much intentional. But the device also loses its charm since the band doesn’t mix up the chord progression until almost three minutes in. –Dan Caffrey

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93. “Erase/Replace”

Echoes, Silence, Patience and Grace (2007)

Take away that stupid noodling in the very beginning, and the song ain’t too shabby. –Michael Roffman

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92. “Ain’t It the Life”

There Is Nothing Left to Lose (1999)

At this point, you’re probably thinking: “God, these writers are some miserable pricks.” But don’t fret. We’re inching towards the part of the list where we cease taking cheap (or at least inexpensive) shots and start rolling up our cuffs to display our Foo tattoos – we call them “Footoos.” In the meantime, we’ll let Grohl take potshots at his own work: “‘Ain’t It the Life’ sounds like an Eagles song or something, and I hate The Eagles.” Damn, Dave. Don’t be so hard on yourself. That’s our job. –Matt Melis

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91. “On the Mend”

In Your Honor (2005)

“It’s a simple, easy-feeling song,” Grohl told NME of “On the Mend”. “It was written in London. I wrote it sitting in a hotel room. It’s another example of how we’d start with an acoustic guitar, do that first, and then start adding to it.” Pleasant story for a pleasant song that does absolutely nothing for their catalog except move along an album that’s much too long to begin with. –Michael Roffman
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90. “Halo”

One by One (2002)

“Halo” is one of those frustrating, mid-tier Foo Fighter tracks. The ones that threaten to become interesting before settling for filler. At the time Grohl heard elements of Tom Petty, Guided by Voices, and Cheap Trick in the track, whereas we would just prefer to hear those artists’ songs instead. –Justin Gerber

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89. “If Ever”

“The Pretender” single

What plays like the Foo Fighters’ version of “Tuesday’s Gone” perks up the ears whenever Taylor Hawkins interrupts with a fill, then sinks back into slumberland with the verses. Not a bad B-side, but far from essential. —Dan Caffrey

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88. “Statues”

Echoes, Silence, Patience and Grace (2007)

I don’t approve of a song that could be mistaken as a bad Phish song, and I like a number of Phish songs! “Just two ordinary people/ You and Me/ Time will turn us into statues/ Eventually.” See you at Bonaroo circa 1998, Dave! It’s a harsh criticism, but while the band was trying to find a balance between the hard and soft from their previous album, it isn’t steady here. –Justin Gerber

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87. “Free Me”

In Your Honor (2005)

I would never accuse Foo Fighters of taking a cue from latter-day Metallica, but the riff in “Free Me” definitely takes a cue from that less-than-appreciated haircut era (cue outrage comments … NOW!). The harder the Foos try to “rawk” in the 21st century, the harder it is to fall in love with the material. “Free Me” is also 60 seconds too long, like most tracks on In Your Honor–Justin Gerber

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86. “Savior Breath”

Saint Cecilia EP (2015)

What is it with Foo Fighters and boneheaded puns? “Savior Breath” is right up there with “Word Forward” in terms of the stupidity of its wordplay. The song does have a tangible energy, though, even if the riffing goes into full-on butt rock at times. –Dan Caffrey
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85. “T-Shirt”

Concrete and Gold (2017)

Foo Fighters’ best album opener in a while is a mere 82 seconds long, sound familiar? But it compresses a nice, big, heartworn melody that borrows more from Rivers Cuomo than Paul McCartney before a brief, wailing guitar riff that could’ve been Gov’t Mule’s Warren Haynes. In its short time it accomplishes everything it sets out to do; prepping us for the rarity of a Foo Fighters album that may not actually sound like the others. –Dan Weiss

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84. “The Neverending Sigh”

Saint Cecilia EP (2015)

“Woe is me/ The end is near/ Thought you’d never leave,” Grohl sings on the closing track of their Saint Cecilia EP. It’s an agreeable closer to a commendable collection of songs, and as I wrote in my original review, it’s “a mountain of riffs and distortion that digs into the band’s love of ’70s rock.” Yeah, that’s about right. –Michael Roffman

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83. “Congregation”

Sonic Highways (2014)

At this point, the verdict has been handed down on Sonic Highways. It’s an ambitious, innovative, and even inspiring project, but it ultimately made for a rather scatterbrained and bland record by Foo standards. “Congregation”, recorded in Nashville with previous Grohl collaborator Zac Brown on board, might be the most successful recording of the batch and even drew a clever comparison between the local music community and a religious congregation; however, like so many of its brethren, the song proves almost instantly forgettable and feels like it should end about two minutes before it actually does. Can I get a hallelujah? Naw, I didn’t expect so. –Matt Melis

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82. “The One”

Orange County Soundtrack (2002)

Another Foo Fighters song where the verse makes a better chorus than the actual chorus. There’s half of a good song here, and it works a little bit better than most of the other songs written for the Orange County soundtrack. Dave Grohl’s acting in the music video ain’t too shabby, either. –Dan Caffrey

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81. “Still”

In Your Honor (2005)

Like the the album itself, the major fault with In Your Honor’s “Still” is its length. If this was a 90-second intro or a bridge into a more deserving, “epic” track, then it would be more forgivable. The music glides along with its pleasant acoustic guitar, but with a promise of a build that never delivers. For being based on a harrowing true story (a crime scene post-suicide), it somehow doesn’t earn its runtime. Fine, but could have been better. –Justin Gerber

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80. “Burn Away”

One by One (2002)

“We’ll burn away, burn away, burn away my pride,” Grohl pines again and again and again on, you guessed it, “Burn Away”. Similar to a few almost-there cuts off of One by One, this track’s marred by a dreadful use of repetition. And while it’s clear that Grohl’s repeating himself to convey a sense of bleeding-heart compassion — ahem, something they were particularly fond of around this time; just take a glance at the album’s artwork — it becomes one swell of white noise. Enjoyable white noise, to be fair, but nonetheless white noise. –Michael Roffman
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79. “Run”

Concrete and Gold (2017)

It’s probably safe to say this is one of the heaviest Beatles ripoffs ever recorded, considering those baroque McCartney chords aren’t normally accompanied by death-metal shrieks. If you squint a little, the split between the earnestness of the melody here and the Cannibal Corpse-inflected vocal is almost extreme as Damian Abraham from Fucked Up roaring over, well, Foo Fighters-esque riffs. But Dave Grohl has surprisingly few songs that strive for this size grandeur. One of them is “Everlong”. –Dan Weiss

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78. “How I Miss You”

“I’ll Stick Around” single

One of Grohl’s hindsight fears about the song “I’ll Stick Around” was that listeners would read harsh sentiments about former bandmate Kurt Cobain into its title and lyrics. It also probably didn’t help the single’s B-side was called “How I Miss You”. The brokenhearted song marks an early, less-sophisticated stab at an abrupt shift from near-whisper minimalism to full-band explosion. Consider it part of the band’s fossil record or a solid stepping stone towards what came next. –Matt Melis

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77. “Winnebago”

“Big Me” single

It’s nearly impossible for me to listen to “Winnebago” and not think of Spaceballs (the movie, not the flamethrower). The name Foo Fighters, of course, comes from the term given to WWII UFOs, and early Foo artwork often featured flying saucers. So, if Grohl and, well, Grohl sounds like he’s blowing out the windows in a garage here, why not rock out in a Winnebago cruising through space at ludicrous speed? I’d actually go see that sequel. –Matt Melis
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76. “Dirty Water”

Concrete and Gold (2017)

On Concrete and Gold, Dave Grohl uses negative space like he hasn’t since 1997, and on the muted jangle of “Dirty Water” he even sneakily incorporates some flamenco guitar fills that aren’t the least bit jarring, and the rare female vocal in this largely testosterone-identified batch of boys. It’s so skillfully layered that you may not even notice these elements until three or four listens. A Foo Fighters tune subtle enough to reveal itself over time? Not quite; around 2:41 it promptly bludgeons you with riffs for another few minutes, but what did you expect? –Dan Weiss
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